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Local

  • It's a sign of the times

    Lancaster County used to require politicians to wait until 30 days before an election to put up their political signs.

    County Council voted at its May 5 meeting on first reading to delete the 30-day time limit from its ordinances. County Administrator Steve Willis said it was wise to change the county’s ordinance, based on the lawsuit filed by York Mayor Eddie Lee in York County.

  • Matson Street trees get a reprieve

    KERSHAW – A majority of the Matson Street trees might escape the chainsaw. After an executive session Monday night, Kershaw Town Council voted unanimously to halt the tree cutting except for seven trees deemed dead by S.C. Forestry Commission Urban Forester Lois Edwards.

    About 10 people spoke during citizens comments to protest the tree cutting.

    A group of people wanting to save the trees located in the historic area of Kershaw had asked for Edwards’ assessment of the health of the trees.

  • Rap, R&B artist to release album

    Pierre Coleman always keeps paper scraps and a pencil or pen in his pants pocket.

    He never knows when inspiration will hit that will allow him to immediately turn his thoughts into rhyme.

    As he sits on the couch in his mother’s apartment, he begins to recite some of those raps, which have since been recorded in a professional music studio.

    Coleman, a Lancaster native who calls himself Young HeartAttack on the microphone, is a rapper and singer who is preparing to release his first solo album entitled “I’m Here.”

  • Kershaw County teen killed in wreck

    Two Lancaster County men were hospitalized after being involved in a single-vehicle wreck Sunday night that claimed the life of one of the other passengers, a Kershaw County teen.

    Antonio Lee Seegars, 17, who lived in the northern part of Kershaw County, died on the scene about 9:45 p.m. when the 2006 Dodge minivan he was riding in struck a ditch and overturned along S.C. 157, said Lance Cpl. Jeff Gaskin of the S.C. Highway Patrol.

    The accident happened in Kershaw County, just south of the Lancaster County line.

  • Success requires 'strong will, guts

    Johnathan C. Ryan

    jryan@thelancasternews.com

    Gus Deligiannidis has a saying: “I have my hands on it.”

    Deligiannidis, or simply Gus, as he’s known by most folks, has been serving a mixture of Greek, Italian and Southern favorites in Lancaster County for 20 years.

    He opened The House of Pizza in Kershaw in the spring of 1988, and in 1992, propelled by its success, opened Gus’s Family Pizza Restaurant in Lancaster.

    Gus, 61, prides himself on his dishes – and what he puts in them.

  • What do the county's new animal control laws require?

    Lancaster County Animal Control Director Joel Hinson said there may be some confusion about the new animal control laws County Council finalized last week. Do they require you to license your pets? Does it apply to cats and dogs? What are the requirements for dogs deemed dangerous?

    Here are some of the frequently asked questions, and answers, about the new animal laws:

    Q: Does the new law require pet owners to register their pets?

  • Mark your calendar for Battle of Beckhamville

    GREAT FALLS – Have you ever seen a salt maker? Or watch someone make a broom? Or see how tombstones were made from slate?

    How about an 18th century lace maker or a refugee from France?

    All of this can be experienced at the seventh annual Battle of Beckhamville re-enactment, set for June 6, 7 and 8 in Great Falls on the original battlefield.

  • No shortage of events in area this week

    No one in Lancaster County should complain that there's nothing to do here this week. From Lancaster to Kershaw, to the air, the streets and local art galleries, there will be something to do for everyone starting Thursday night. Most of the events are free or offered at low cost.

    Thursday

    • Street Fest, 5 to 9 p.m. downtown Lancaster

  • FAA investigating crash

    The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the May 2 crash landing of a small airplane on the Catawba River.

    Fort Lawn resident John Sedberry was piloting the Glasair plane that was en route to Florida. His wife and their two dogs were traveling with him. No one was hurt in the crash.

    Sedberry told authorities the engine shut off, forcing the plane to crash land on the river, just moments after take off from nearby Lancaster County Airport.

    A Lancaster County Sheriff's Office report says the plane was towed to a nearby dock by someone's personal boat.

  • Residents oppose plan to down trees

    KERSHAW – About 25 trees are slated to be cut down for safety considerations on Matson Street in Kershaw.

    The first few came down recently

    But the decision to remove the trees, approved earlier this year by Kershaw Town Council, has upset some town residents.

    Denise Hegler, who lives on Matson Street, though not where the trees are slated for removal, expects at least 10 people will speak at Monday's Town Council meeting to tell council members they oppose the plans.