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Local

  • City to pay for Doomsday field improvements

    The city of Lancaster is making an investment in the quality of the Lancaster High School baseball field, giving outsiders one more reason to come to Lancaster.

    Now called “Doomsday Corner,” the home of the Lancaster Bruins high school baseball team, Lancaster City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to fund improvements to the field’s surface.

    Improving the field will make high school play safer and qualify the field for collegiate play that’s coming in the near future.

  • Indian Land mom gets best gift ever

    Chris McGinn

    For The Lancaster News

    Pam Wiltsie had the best Mother’s Day ever.

    Last Thursday, her sons Paul and Michael Swan returned to Indian Land after more than a year in Afghanistan with the 178th Engineer Battalion of the S.C. National Guard in Fort Mill.

    That evening they surprised her youngest son, Jacob, 7, at his Little League ball game.

    Having the whole family reunited was emotional for Wiltsie, who spent last Mother’s Day separated from her two oldest sons.

  • Kershaw Town budget less than last year's

    The town of Kershaw has good news to report. The town budget for 2008-09 is less than last year’s.

    At its meeting Monday night, Kershaw Town Council went over the town’s proposed budget with Town Adminstrator Tony Starnes, and voted unanimously to approve it on first reading.

    Mayor Tommy Baker commended Starnes for his work to tighten up the budget.

    “He has reduced expenses for the town of Kershaw,” Baker said about the almost 2-percent drop in the proposed budget over last year’s.

  • Wilson featured in German film

    Lancaster County resident Kitty Wilson-Evans and the world-class re-enactments she does at Historic Brattonsville are of interest to German tourists, who are increasingly seeking out new and interesting places in the U.S. to visit.

    Wilson-Evans performed part of a scenario in her usual role as the slave Kessie on May 3 for a German television station, GeoSaison, which was touring South Carolina and Georgia to highlight the states’ tourist attractions.

  • Brothers, Doster share love for art

    The Bailey boys look for Cherry Doster’s white truck parked in front of the downtown Lancaster art gallery she owns with husband and sculptor, Bob Doster.

    They live in the big blue house across the KMG America parking lot on Market Street.

    If the truck’s there, the boys – Scottie, 10, and twins, Devonta and Jevonta, 11 – walk over after school for a few hours of art education.

    Or chores around the studio.

    Or a dinner out to Twin Dragon, one of their favorite restaurants.

  • Zoning for parking lot in question

    KERSHAW – A parking lot behind the Bojangles restaurant built by the restaurant’s owners has caused quite a stir among some residents living near it.

    The owners of the parking lot, brothers John and Ronald Campbell of Chesterfield, who also own the restaurant, have built the lot in a residential zoning, which is not allowed.

    The zoning ordinance was implemented in the town of Kershaw in 1999.

    Lancaster County Planner Kenneth Cauthen said construction on the parking lot started in March 2007.

  • Sims Foundation awards $2.3 million in grants

    Medical care and assistance with basic needs for low-income citizens are among projects funded by the J. Marion Sims Foundation’s most recent grant awards. Eleven organizations in Lancaster, Chester and York counties are recipients of grants totaling about $2.3 million.

  • Helium co. could float across border

    A helium balloon company is considering a move to Lancaster County.

    Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. President Keith Tunnell said Helium and Balloons Across America, now based in Charlotte, may move to Lancaster Business Park. County Council has approved giving the company 43 acres in the park.

    But the plans are still up in the air, with state and local incentives for the company still being finalized, Tunnell said.

  • It's a sign of the times

    Lancaster County used to require politicians to wait until 30 days before an election to put up their political signs.

    County Council voted at its May 5 meeting on first reading to delete the 30-day time limit from its ordinances. County Administrator Steve Willis said it was wise to change the county’s ordinance, based on the lawsuit filed by York Mayor Eddie Lee in York County.

  • Matson Street trees get a reprieve

    KERSHAW – A majority of the Matson Street trees might escape the chainsaw. After an executive session Monday night, Kershaw Town Council voted unanimously to halt the tree cutting except for seven trees deemed dead by S.C. Forestry Commission Urban Forester Lois Edwards.

    About 10 people spoke during citizens comments to protest the tree cutting.

    A group of people wanting to save the trees located in the historic area of Kershaw had asked for Edwards’ assessment of the health of the trees.