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Local

  • Taylor Burgess defies grim doctor's diagnosis

    Taylor Burgess' body was so weak he had to crawl to get around his house.

    A rare syndrome called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is the reason why Burgess went from marching in the band to receiving all his schooling from home.

    At one point, doctors told the Burgess' family to prepare for his funeral.

    But thanks to proper medical care and a whole lot of prayer and determination, Burgess' syndrome went into remission. He returned to Buford High for his senior year and is now about to receive his high school diploma.

    Problems arise

  • DSS honors foster parents

    So often foster parents don't get the recognition they deserve for their contributions to children who have been taken out of traumatic situations, but that wasn't the case May 15.

    At Etta's Kitchen in Lancaster, the local S.C. Department of Social Services office showed its foster parents how much they're appreciated with a banquet.

    DSS takes children taken out of abusive or neglect situations as deemed by the courts.

    The children are then placed into the foster program for placement in a nurturing environment with qualified foster parents.

  • Veterans to be remembered at Memorial Day service

    Lancaster County residents will be able to honor veterans during a Memorial Day remembrance ceremony at Lancaster Memorial Park on Sunday.

    The ceremony, in its 17th year, begins at 3 p.m. with the posting of colors by the Lancaster Marine Corps League. The national anthem will be played, and Carl Parker, chaplain for American Legion Post 31, will give the invocation.

    The program will recognize four Gold Star mothers this year. Gold Star mothers have lost children to war.

  • District to cut jobs in new budget

    A slumping economy and changes in state law have affected how money will be allocated within the local school district.

    The Lancaster County school board took its first look at the proposed 2008-09 budget Tuesday night.

    District finance director Tony Walker told the board that cuts will have to be made to balance the budget, which lists revenue at just over $77 million. Expenditures in the proposed budget exceed revenue by more than $1.3 million.

  • No summer camp at Treetops in '08

    VAN WYCK – The woods at Camp TreeTops will remain quiet this summer.

    The 624-acre Van Wyck camp, which serves children through The Family Center in Charlotte, served 458 children at summer camps last year, said camp executive director Kristy Davis. Due to some strategic changes and funding issues, Davis said, the camps will not be offered this summer.

    "There's not a nonprofit in the world right now that's not struggling," Davis said. "We're taking the summer off. Hang in there with us. We're not going anywhere."

  • Expect more troopers on roads this holiday weekend

    You may be enjoying a long weekend for Memorial Day, but the S.C. Highway Patrol and other law enforcement agencies will have extra officers on the roads.

    The Memorial Day weekend is considered the unofficial start of the summer vacation season.

    It also kicks off what the Highway Patrol calls the 100 Deadly Days of Summer, as traffic deaths often go up during the summer, with more people traveling to vacation destinations between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

  • County rolls forward on Continental incentives

    To the disappointment of several former Continental Tire employees, a developer that will house the tire company's new headquarters in Indian Land is one step closer to receiving major incentives.

    County Council unanimously passed second reading Monday to approve a fee-in-lieu of taxes agreement with MacMillan Investments, which is leasing its building on S.C. 160 to Continental Tire.

    Continental Tire will move 300 employees from its Charlotte headquarters to the 75,000-square foot building in McMillan Business Park in Indian Land.

  • Senior Helpers opens

    INDIAN LAND Opening Senior Helpers is Seth Zamek's way of giving back, he said.

    When his mother-in-law suffered a broken hip after a fall, the family needed a professional caregiver, Zamek said.

    The experience left such an impression on Zamek and his wife, Jennie, that they decided to open their own Senior Helpers caregiving franchise after Jennie's mother died.

    Senior Helpers offers companion and personal in-home health-care services, primarily for the elderly, that range from one-hour to 24-hour care, Zamek said.

  • Springs Memorial lays off 43

    The local hospital is feeling the pinch of a slow local economy.

    Springs Memorial Hospital laid off 43 employees across a number of departments Monday. Sixteen positions are eliminated through attrition, meaning the posts are not being filled after they are vacated.

    The reduction in staff won't impact patient care, a news release from the hospital said.

  • No more patching of city lot

    For those who might be wondering, the mess at the Lancaster Fire Department is a sign of progress being made, not mayhem.

    The Lancaster Fire Department's station on Arch Street may appear dysfunctional, with only dirt and scaffolding in place of where pavement once was for trucks to drive over when headed to a call.

    But the current look is part of a $150,000 project that calls for a new parking lot and retaining wall that the city of Lancaster allocated in its 2007-08 budget.

    It's long overdue, said Lancaster Fire Chief Chris Nunnery.