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Local

  • Funding for agencies in question

    Rebecca Lyon cried as she addressed County Council on Thursday night.

    Council is considering not funding agencies, such as the Learning Institute for Tomorrow (LIFT) and Southside Adult Family Literacy, in this year's budget, even though it has funded them in the past.

    Lyon, a LIFT student, gave an emotional plea to council members, asking them to keep LIFT's funding in the budget. LIFT assists adults and older teens who have had mental illness or substance abuse problems to obtain GEDs (general equivalency diplomas), life skills and coping skills to succeed.

  • Heath Springs annual budget boosted by federal, state grants

    HEATH SPRINGS – While it appears that much of the proposed 2008-09 Heath Springs town budget is larger than usual, it's really just a reflection of the town's good fortune.

    An $872,000 federal grant received last year for water system upgrades is included in the proposed budget. In fact, all grants received in the future are to be reflected as revenue in the town's budgets, Mayor Ann Taylor said.

  • Class may help spark career in welding for students

    Some area high school students have discovered the spark that may lead to a successful career.

    Thirteen seniors who take welding classes at the Lancaster High School Career Center recently earned a national certification from the American Welding Society.

    They took the test May 6 at Florence-Darlington Technical College. All 13 who went passed the exam.

    Class instructor Lynn Robertson said this is the first time welding students at Lancaster High have earned a certification while still in school.

  • Taylor Burgess defies grim doctor's diagnosis

    Taylor Burgess' body was so weak he had to crawl to get around his house.

    A rare syndrome called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is the reason why Burgess went from marching in the band to receiving all his schooling from home.

    At one point, doctors told the Burgess' family to prepare for his funeral.

    But thanks to proper medical care and a whole lot of prayer and determination, Burgess' syndrome went into remission. He returned to Buford High for his senior year and is now about to receive his high school diploma.

    Problems arise

  • DSS honors foster parents

    So often foster parents don't get the recognition they deserve for their contributions to children who have been taken out of traumatic situations, but that wasn't the case May 15.

    At Etta's Kitchen in Lancaster, the local S.C. Department of Social Services office showed its foster parents how much they're appreciated with a banquet.

    DSS takes children taken out of abusive or neglect situations as deemed by the courts.

    The children are then placed into the foster program for placement in a nurturing environment with qualified foster parents.

  • Veterans to be remembered at Memorial Day service

    Lancaster County residents will be able to honor veterans during a Memorial Day remembrance ceremony at Lancaster Memorial Park on Sunday.

    The ceremony, in its 17th year, begins at 3 p.m. with the posting of colors by the Lancaster Marine Corps League. The national anthem will be played, and Carl Parker, chaplain for American Legion Post 31, will give the invocation.

    The program will recognize four Gold Star mothers this year. Gold Star mothers have lost children to war.

  • District to cut jobs in new budget

    A slumping economy and changes in state law have affected how money will be allocated within the local school district.

    The Lancaster County school board took its first look at the proposed 2008-09 budget Tuesday night.

    District finance director Tony Walker told the board that cuts will have to be made to balance the budget, which lists revenue at just over $77 million. Expenditures in the proposed budget exceed revenue by more than $1.3 million.

  • No summer camp at Treetops in '08

    VAN WYCK – The woods at Camp TreeTops will remain quiet this summer.

    The 624-acre Van Wyck camp, which serves children through The Family Center in Charlotte, served 458 children at summer camps last year, said camp executive director Kristy Davis. Due to some strategic changes and funding issues, Davis said, the camps will not be offered this summer.

    "There's not a nonprofit in the world right now that's not struggling," Davis said. "We're taking the summer off. Hang in there with us. We're not going anywhere."

  • Expect more troopers on roads this holiday weekend

    You may be enjoying a long weekend for Memorial Day, but the S.C. Highway Patrol and other law enforcement agencies will have extra officers on the roads.

    The Memorial Day weekend is considered the unofficial start of the summer vacation season.

    It also kicks off what the Highway Patrol calls the 100 Deadly Days of Summer, as traffic deaths often go up during the summer, with more people traveling to vacation destinations between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

  • County rolls forward on Continental incentives

    To the disappointment of several former Continental Tire employees, a developer that will house the tire company's new headquarters in Indian Land is one step closer to receiving major incentives.

    County Council unanimously passed second reading Monday to approve a fee-in-lieu of taxes agreement with MacMillan Investments, which is leasing its building on S.C. 160 to Continental Tire.

    Continental Tire will move 300 employees from its Charlotte headquarters to the 75,000-square foot building in McMillan Business Park in Indian Land.