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Local

  • Lancaster losing old Burger King, but will get new one

    Lancaster’s Burger King restaurant is about to undergo a whopper of a makeover.

    The popular fast food restaurant located on North Main Street will close Monday so it can be torn down and rebuilt.

    Burger King spokeswoman Denise Wilson said the new building will feature an open-view ceiling and a double drive-thru.

    “It’s more efficient and modern-looking,” Wilson said. “It’s a great new look for the restaurant.”

  • City agrees to fund Bundy Auditorium improvements

    Lancaster City Council recently agreed to contribute $32,650 from the city’s hospitality tax revenue to make more improvements at Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    USCL Educational Foundation President Don Rushing and Bundy Performing Arts Series Manager Peggy Little sought the funding at a meeting last month.

  • Deputies arrest Pit Stop owner, bartender on cocaine charges

    The owner of the Pit Stop on Grace Avenue and a bartender there both face drug charges after an undercover informant bought cocaine from the bar last month.

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office charged the owner, Bill Laney, 56, 1564 Riverside Road, on Feb. 21 with distribution of cocaine and trafficking in cocaine.

    The bartender, Paula Barton Knight, 45, was charged with possession with intent to distribute cocaine.

  • Community celebrates opening of Care Health Center

    Staff and supporters of the Care Health Center gathered Tuesday to celebrate the new clinic's mission to provide health services to anyone, regardless of his or her ability to pay.

    During the open house, Dr. Nimal Perera, the clinic's sole physician, his staff and workers of CareNet met with various individuals supporting the clinic, which has been open for two months.

    CareNet, the nonprofit group committed to serving the medically underserved in Lancaster County with pharmaceutical and primary care assistance, operates the clinic.

  • Kershaw NACCP branch sets banquet

    KERSHAW – Members and supporters of the Kershaw branch of the NAACP will look back on activities in the past year and look to the next during the branch’s annual banquet Saturday night.

    Starting at 6 p.m. at the Andrew Jackson Recreation Center, the event will include dinner, guest speaker Dr. Lonnie Randolph, president of the NAACP State Conference and a short program. It is expected to last about an hour.

  • Second annual KLS Walk set for Saturday

    It’s been a year since the first walk in memory of Ryan McKinney, and during the second annual walk Saturday, progress will be celebrated and new goals highlighted.

    Starting at 10 a.m. at the Lancaster High School track, the public is asked to stop by for three hours of fun, learning and remembering the life of McKinney, a former Lancaster High School student who died of a heart attack in February 2006 while hospitalized in Columbia. He was only 19.

  • County population grows by 20 percent

    Despite a slight decrease in housing permits issued here, the population of Lancaster County continues to grow, said County Administrator Steve Willis.

    The 2000 Census showed the population of the county at 61,351. In July 2006, after a challenge by the county that it had grown more than the estimated 63,628 population, the population was estimated at 71,723.

    Now, the county’s population is estimated at 73,393, an almost 20 percent population increase since 2000, Willis said.

  • Thomas, Starnes file for House seat

    Two Democrats are competing for the state House District 45 seat.

    County Council District 2 representative Fred Thomas, 44, and Kershaw Town Administrator Tony Starnes, 58, have both filed for the seat with the Lancaster County Democratic Party.

    Fighting for jobs

    Thomas is serving his second term on Lancaster County Council.

    Before serving on County Council, Thomas also served as the state ombudsman for SCDAODAS, one of Gov. Jim Hodges' cabinet agencies.

  • 911 Driving School opening soon

    By Chris McGinn For The Lancaster News

    Parents of wannabe teen drivers can breathe a sigh of relief. A new business serving the area offers to take the task of training student drivers to the next level.

    The 911 Driving School, located in Fort Mill, offers teen driving courses taught exclusively by law enforcement professionals, including state troopers and local police officers.

    S.C. Highway Patrol officer Jeremy Sisler, an Indian Land resident, is the school's training director. His brother, Matt, owns the driving school.

  • USCL reveals master plan

    Nearly a dozen new buildings could adorn the campus of the University of South Carolina at Lancaster in the near future.

    In September, The Boudreaux Group, an architectural firm in Columbia, began working on a master plan for USCL that includes more administrative and classroom buildings, new health services facilities and student housing.

    The master plan sketches were developed based on USCL's newly created strategic plan, which USCL Dean Dr. John Catalano introduced before Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce members on Thursday at the Carole Ray Dowling Center.