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Local

  • Kershaw picks spot for park

    KERSHAW - A decision has been made on where a new children's playground in Kershaw will be built, and it's likely a familiar spot to many.

    The Kershaw Community Park Council approved a 6,000-square-foot site within the Stevens Park property, home to the Kershaw Recreation Center, said co-chairwoman Beverly Timmons.

    The group initially sought a different site on the Stevens Park property, but the town of Kershaw would have to open a road and close part of Ingram Street for that site to be used.

  • Philly trip altered my brain molecules

    Four planes in four days, including two 50-seaters, the streets of Philadelphia and a heart-stopping art exhibit – I survived it all.

    Thanks to a Lancaster County Council of the Arts grant, and the generosity of Fran Gardner and Christina Chastain, I had the opportunity to travel to Philadelphia for what we three believe was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

  • Red Cross volunteer helps out after Alabama tornado

    INDIAN LAND - Mike Huffstetler began learning about emergency response as a 12-year-old Boy Scout. He went on to become an Eagle Scout, volunteered with Gaston County Emergency Management for 10 years and even saved a swimmer's life in the 1970s.

    "It's amazing how your training comes back right away," Huffstetler said of facing an emergency situation. He has taken first aid, CPR, Red Cross and FEMA courses.

  • County Council committee to revise noise ordinance

    After all the noise about concrete plants in Indian Land, and an outside study that suggests some of the plants are louder than they should be, Lancaster County Council has appointed a committee to study the issue.

    There are now four concrete plants in operation or close to operation at 521 Perimeter Commerce Park – MacLeod Construction, Concrete Supply Co., CEMEX and Blue Dot Readi-Mix.

    The industrial park is adjacent to the Brookchase and subdivisions.

    MacLeod was operating there years before Brookchase was built.

  • Are we doing enough to protect the river?

    First it was the Carolina heelsplitter.

    Now, Lancaster County can add the Catawba River to its endangered list, according to a river advocacy group.

    American Rivers released a report late last week that listed the Catawba – Lancaster County's entire western border – as the No. 1 most endangered river in the nation. Its main threat – outdated water supply management, according to the report.

  • Chamber moves into new home

    The Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce will celebrate its move to new headquarters at 453 Colonial Ave. with an official grand opening and Business After Hours on Thursday.

    All chamber members and guests are invited. The event begins will begin with a ribbon-cutting and grand opening ceremony at 4:30 p.m.

    Food and refreshments will be served and there will be door prizes and tours of the offices offered. The event will end at 6:30 p.m.

  • Cureton to step down from post at Wisconsin university, to return to Lancaster

    RICHLAND CENTER, Wisc. – Dr. Deborah B. Cureton, campus executive officer and dean of the University of Wisconsin-Richland, will retire after the end of the current academic year and an event to honor her is planned for June 1.

    Cureton, who has headed the Richland Center UW campus since July 2001, plans to return to Lancaster to be closer to family.

    Cureton is the daughter of Jethro and Katie Brown of Lancaster. She is the former associate dean at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • Man, 22, dies after cycle wreck

    Stephanie Carnes is trying to understand how her son's life was taken away so suddenly.

    Russell Cory Kennington, 22, died Wednesday from injuries he suffered Tuesday in a one-vehicle accident on Palmer Lloyd Road, just feet from his home.

    Kennington, who was riding a 2006 Yamaha motorcycle, was traveling east at 2:50 p.m. Tuesday when he ran off the right side of the road and was thrown into a wooded area, said Lance Cpl. Jeff Gaskin of the S.C. Highway Patrol.

  • USCL program focuses on Native American studies

    Scholars from throughout the Southeast will gather at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster next week to add new dimensions to the campus' annual Native American Studies Week.

    The celebration, which looks at Native American history and culture in this area, will feature speakers from the Catawba Nation, the University of North Carolina, the University of South Carolina and Warren Wilson College.

    All events are free and open to the public.

  • GOP hopefuls speak at meeting

    The Lancaster County Republican Party offered a chance for the public to meet GOP candidates for local and state office on Tuesday night and, perhaps, give supporters a confidence boost.

    "Our worst candidate will still be better than the Democrats' best candidate," said Winston Smith, chairman of the GOP in Lancaster County, during the meeting, held at the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    County Council candidates speak