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Local

  • Natural gas customers charged twice

    Many natural gas customers in Lancaster County were seeing double on their bank statements last week as a result of an electronic drafting error.

    Officials with Lancaster County Natural Gas Authority say about 3,300 people were charged twice for services this month. The affected customers have payments automatically drawn from their bank accounts each month.

    First Citizens Bank handles those ACH, or automatic clearinghouse, transactions for the gas authority.

  • State education superintendent pushes reform agenda at meeting

    One of the local Rotary clubs got a visit this week from South Carolina's top education official.

    Dr. Jim Rex, the state's superintendent of education, was Lancaster Rotary's guest speaker at its weekly lunch club meeting, held Thursday at the Lancaster Golf Club's Fairway Room.

    Rex, who has been in office over a year now, revisited his five key areas for reform in South Carolina public education, which are:

    - Greater demand and support for innovation

    - More choice

    - A new accountability system

    - Funding

  • USCL honors OSPy winners

     

    Opportunity Scholars got folks at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster in the mood for the Beijing Olympics during the program's annual awards lunch Wednesday.

    Students and faculty alike ran into the multi-purpose room at the university's Bradley Arts and Sciences Building waving paper streamer flags to the "Rocky" and Olympic theme songs to kick off the awards lunch, called the OSPy Awards.

  • Founders planning $20M to $25M headquarters campus near USCL

    Founders Federal Credit Union is planning a campus-style corporate headquarters at Gillsbrook Drive and Plantation Road, the focal point of which will be a 130,000-square-foot corporate center.

    The project, slated to cost between $20 million and $25 million, will initially include the construction of the center and an office-support facility, said Founders chief executive officer Bruce Brumfield. Founders bought nearly 27 acres of land for the project about a month ago.

  • Lancaster firm to build clock tower monument downtown

    Perception Builders of Lancaster has been approved to build a clock tower monument that will include components of the old timepiece from Springs Industries' Lancaster Plant.

    Council voted unanimously Tuesday to award the contract to Perception, the low bidder for the project, at $278,098.

  • Beach, Bash and Boogie dance to raise money for First Steps

    Last year it was billed as strictly a shag event, but this year's dance promises to officer a larger selection of music to get more people on the dance floor.

    Lancaster County First Steps' Beach, Bash and Boogie Dance will be held Saturday from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. at the Bradley Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    Tickets are $35 per person.

    Money from the event will go toward children's books for the Dolly Parton Imagination Library program. First Steps Director Lora Bryson considers the dance the organization's largest annual fundraiser.

  • Three face charges of printing money

    A Lancaster man was arrested Friday after police said he used fake $20 bills at several area restaurants.

    The Lancaster Police Department charged David Rickie Knight Jr., 33, of 2438 Camp Creek Road, with manufacturing and distributing counterfeit money.

    Police responded to several calls about a man driving a burgundy Chevrolet pickup who tried to buy food at the drive-through windows of local restaurants with counterfeit $20 bills.

    An officer later saw Knight, the driver of the truck, give a clerk at Chick-Fil-A a $20 bill for food.

  • Wall threatens business next to old Belk building

    While Lancaster City Council mulls the fate of the old Belk building site downtown, an adjacent business appears threatened by a wall it once shared with the building.

    The wall still stands but is weak and leaks when it rains, said Kirit Shah, co-owner of the adjacent North-South Wholesale. He said the wall was weakened by the demolition process.

    “We just hope it doesn’t come down,” Shah said, adding that the city had contractors evaluate the wall but has yet to take any action.

  • Homeless shelter network looks for a few more churches

    Organizers wanting to start a homeless shelter network among area churches have their sights set on getting a few more churches to commit to move the project forward.

    “Basically, we’ve got all our paper work finished,” said organizer Bill Hutchinson. “We just need to get five more churches on board.”

    Organizers have completed the articles of incorporation and are expecting a tax-exempt charter for the Lancaster County branch of Family Promise, a shelter program whose aim would be to help homeless parents and their children.

  • Teen faces amputation to save her life

    PAGELAND – Hope.

    These are four letters Pam Gainey hangs onto.

    Next week, she’ll travel to Greenville, where surgeons will remove her right leg, hip and pelvis to save her life.

    Pam, 18, is fighting cancer.

    “Hope is all they’re giving us to depend on,” Pam said. “And, I believe in miracles.”

    As her family gathered for church Sunday, the mood inside their mobile home off Steen Road in Jefferson was tense – only Pam could break it with her brand of humor.