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Local

  • Slideshow Included: Courthouse burns

    Blackened roof beams hovered like a skeleton above the brick walls of the Lancaster County Courthouse on Tuesday.

    The beams and a few slate shingles are all that’s left of the roof of the historic building, built in 1828.

    The courtroom was set on fire early Monday morning by an arsonist. The building’s original judge’s bench is a charred shell.

  • City Councilman Preston Blackmon dies

    Lancaster County has lost a piece of history in the death of Lancaster City Councilman Preston Blackmon

    He died Saturday at age 82.

    Blackmon served on council for 31 years, possibly making him Lancaster’s longest serving councilman. He was the second black man elected to City Council.

    He represented District 1 in a fair and just manner, said City Councilman Audrey Curry Jr., who represents District 3.

  • First day of filing brings out city, school candidates

    Filing for City Council Districts 3, 4 and 6, and Lancaster County school board Districts 2, 4 and 6 opened at noon Friday.

    Candidates who announced they were running for Lancaster City Council seats in July officially entered the race on Friday.

    Here's who filed for City Council:

    – District 3 – incumbent Audrey Curry and former City Councilwoman Linda Blackmon-Brace

    – District 4 – incumbent Bill Sumner and political newcomer Tamara Green

    - District 6 – John Griffin

  • DHEC official: Loud concrete plants should get quieter soon

    Ron Garrett of the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control said he recently spent the night in a trailer near the Brookchase neighborhood in Indian Land.

    Garrett has been acting as a mediator between Brookchase residents and the concrete plants in 521 Perimeter Commerce Park.

    Residents of Brookchase and nearby Lakeview Landing say the plants generate large amounts of noise and dust.

    Garrett updated County Council members on measures being taken to reach a solution between the plants and residents Monday night.

  • Lancaster native enjoyed playing small role in independent feature film 'Nailed'

    A Lancaster native has landed a role in an independent movie filmed largely in Columbia.

    The Rev. Stanley Truesdale, who now lives in Columbia, has a role in the movie "Nailed," which stars Jessica Biel and Jake Gyllenhaal.

    The political satire is about a woman who gets a nail lodged in her head and travels to Washington, D.C., to fight for better health care. While there, she falls in love with a congressman (Gyllenhaal) who advocates for her cause.

  • Estridge seeks $400,000 for industrial park

    Kershaw's industrial park isn't attracting a lot of interest from prospective tenants.

    The park is more of a site, consisting of a tree farm right now, said Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. President Keith Tunnell.

    But he sees great potential for the 120-acre site, with its access to U.S. 601, a heavy truck route, and Interstate 20 in nearby Camden.

    "The more sites you've got, the better" for attracting companies, Tunnell said. "And a park is better than a site. It would give us two prospects in the southern part of the county.'

  • School Tools drive seeks supplies

    Communities in Schools has kicked off its 2008 School Tools campaign that collects pencils and other school supplies for children in need.

    The campaign, now in its 12th year, is the area's largest school supply collection.

    Classroom Central and WSOC-TV are again partnering with the initiative, which began Friday and runs through Aug. 31.

    Businesses and individuals are asked to donate various supplies, which will be given to children who need them.

  • Summer Time Fun not all games

    HEATH SPRINGS – Classic games such as Bingo, checkers and Battleship decorated the gymnasium floor at Heath Springs Elementary School.

    Every Tuesday for nearly two months, dozens of students picked which games they would play with their peers. Because of the wide selection, each day could bring a different gaming experience for any given student.

    But there was much more going on than board games.

  • O'Brien to step down from council

    Lancaster City Councilman Danny O'Brien announced Friday that he won't seek a fourth term.

    O'Brien, who represents District 6, made his announcement on the first day of filing for City Council and Lancaster County school board seats. He said it had been a pleasure to serve the city.

    "After 12 years of service, I feel that now is a good time for me to step down," O'Brien said.

    "I have learned a lot during the past years about city government and I appreciate the opportunity that you all have given me to serve on council."

  • Center all ears no more

    The Listening Center, which has offered support groups free of charge for more than 20 years, closed its doors on Thursday.

    Lindsay Pace, who has been director of the center for the last three months, said the agency is closing due to a lack of funding. She didn't get specific.

    "A lot of people are sad to see it leaving," Pace said. "It's been difficult for a lot of people.'

    The New Hope Group of Narcotics Anonymous will continue to meet at the center. Pace said she believes the fibromyalgia support group will continue to meet there.