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Local

  • 16-year-old from Indian Land plans Chicago Marathon run

    An Indian Land teenager has trained eight months to run in his first-ever marathon for a cause he supports.
    Mason Mazurek, 16, will run in the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 8 for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.
    His goal is to finish the 26.2 miles in six and a half hours.
    “I’ve trained a good amount, so I’m definitely feeling confident,” said Mason, a junior at Indian Land High School.
    He has raised about $1,200 for St. Jude, and hopes to raise at least $1,500.

  • Foster pups teach 5th graders to care for nature’s treasures

    The most popular spot at McDonald Green Elementary is teacher Kim Threatt’s science lab. Some students skip recess to spend a little more time there, and even teachers and principals find excuses to drop by.
    The pull is puppy love.
    About five weeks ago, Threatt began fostering two puppies for the Lancaster SPCA – Bo and Lucy. Threatt decided to take them to school and teach responsible pet care. The puppies joined more than a dozen animals bringing science to life at McDonald Green.

  • $600K in grants to aid crime-victim services

    Crime-victim services in Lancaster County received $600,000 in funding this week with the awarding of federal grants to the sheriff’s office, the solicitor’s office and Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault.
    The federal Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) grants were announced Wednesday by S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson. He held a press conference to award $2.3 million in victim-services grants to organizations in Lancaster, Chester and York counties.

  • County tackling challenges related to growth, policing

    About 135 businesspeople, elected officials and school personnel attended the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce’s State of the Community breakfast Friday at USC Lancaster.
    Representatives from three entities – Lancaster Police Department, Lancaster County School District and Lancaster County Economic Development – updated community members on happenings in their fields.
    The breakfast was the chamber’s ninth State of the Community event. The education component was added this year.

  • 10 weeks premature | 2 pounds, 5 ounces | 94 days in NICU

    The March of Dimes’ annual fundraising walk, March for Babies, will be held next weekend, and leading the Lancaster walk will be ambassador family Brandon and Emily Hunter with their 17-month-old son, Holden.
    Holden was born 10 weeks early and weighed 2 pounds, 5 ounces. He spent his first 94 days in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Novant Health Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte.

  • Yes, it’s still a bowling alley, but now home to charity duo

    Christian Services and HOPE in Lancaster have joined forces to restore an old community gathering space and make it the hub of their charity operations.
    The building they’ve chosen is no ordinary office space. In fact, it’s not an office at all. It’s the Lancaster Bowling Center.
    “Anybody I told thought I was crazy for getting a bowling alley,” said Eric Kramer, executive director of Christian Services. “But if the bowling half could cover all the expenses, then the other half of the building is basically free.”

  • 8 eyesores demolished in Brooklyn

    Eight abandoned houses on Lancaster’s Starnes Street have been torn down through a state program aimed at eliminating community blight.
    And no one is happier to see it than Lancaster County Sheriff Barry Faile. Starnes Street is off the east end of Brooklyn Avenue.
    “That specific area has been a haven for all types of serious criminal activity, including murder,” Faile said, citing the 2012 strangulation death of Linda Massey Gaymon inside one of the houses. Last year, Terry Catoe was sentenced to life in prison for killing Gaymon.

  • City council cheers Dixie Darlings team

    Lancaster’s Dixie Darlings softball team took its bows at this week’s city council meeting, and Mayor John Howard read a proclamation congratulating the team on its dominant run to the Dixie World Series.
    The 8-and-under all-stars were District 2 champions, South Carolina state champions and finished No. 2 in the World Series.
    Howard read the proclamation after the pledge and invocation at Tuesday night’s council meeting.

  • United Way sets target at $425,000

    United Way of Lancaster County kicked off its 2017-18 campaign Thursday, setting a $425,000 goal, almost 9 percent more than the drive raised last year.
    Meeting this year’s goal won’t be easy, said United Way Executive Director Deborah Boulware. One reason is that one of the drive’s biggest contributors in the past, Duracell, is cutting back in preparation for closing its Lancaster plant by 2019.
    “We are going to have to work harder,” Boulware said. “We got around $125,000 from them last year.”

  • CEO Elias helps Puerto Rico recover

    Red Ventures CEO Ric Elias has launched a nonprofit to raise at least $10 million for the hurricane recovery in his home territory of Puerto Rico, and he has vowed to match up to $5 million himself.
    Elias, who co-founded Red Ventures in 2000 and moved the headquarters to Indian Land in 2009, launched Rebuild Puerto Rico on Wednesday.
    “I care deeply about our island and about the people there,” Elias said. “Puerto Ricans are facing a magnitude of devastation not seen in our lifetime. My heart breaks for those in peril.”