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Local

  • Ambulance wreck injures first responders

    A Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services paramedic and EMT were taken to Springs Memorial Hospital after an accident with a pickup on S.C. 9 Bypass West.
    The accident happened shortly after 3 p.m. Friday in front of Walgreens at the intersection of Gillsbrook Road.
    Injured in the accident were paramedic Timothy Clemmer of Lancaster, driver of the ambulance, and EMT April Sims.

  • Prosecutor: Killers stole marijuana from Tran

    David Kucinski and three other defendants in the Indian Land murder of Randy Tran killed the 20-year-old student in a plot to steal six pounds of marijuana from him, prosecutors alleged at a bond hearing Monday.
    Lancaster County investigators found Tran’s body about 7 p.m. April 5, shot once in the back of the head and partially covered in the woods off Rocky River Trail, after neighbors who saw Kuckinski trying to put the body in a car called 911, Sixth Circuit Deputy Solicitor Lisa Collins told the court.

  • Skyrocketing health premiums plague city

    The city of Lancaster and its 170-plus employees will pay 35 percent higher health insurance premiums next year, after a recent handful of large individual payouts to city employees worsened Lancaster’s rating with the state’s public-employee insurer.
    The city staff and Lancaster City Council are taking a close look at the changes, which take effect Jan. 1, 2017, as the municipality works through the proposed 2016-17 fiscal budget. By law, the city cannot pass along the entire increase to employees. It will be paying 35 percent more, just like them.

  • Indian Land may face trash fees

    Work still hasn’t started on Indian Land’s convenience center, and now Foxhole Recycling Center in Mecklenburg County, which Panhandle residents have used for free since 2013, plans to start charging them fees July 1.
    Lancaster County Administrator Steve Willis said it’s uncertain whether the long-awaited Indian Land trash-disposal site will open by July 1.
    He said county officials were meeting with the project’s sole bidder Friday in the hopes of moving forward with the contract.

  • Asbestos in burned-out buildings

    KERSHAW – For the second time in six months, asbestos removal has become an issue for the town of Kershaw.
    Asbestos has been found in the flooring of the charred remains of the two burned-out buildings on East Marion Street. The buildings burned March 1, 2015.
    The cleanup contract was originally bid in February, but was rebid in mid-April because of the asbestos. Those new bids were due Thursday.
    Lancaster County Building and Zoning has been assisting with the bid process, since Kershaw has no building standards department.

  • Barr Street campus to get historic designation?

    In theory, getting the old Barr Street High School campus on East Meeting Street placed on the National Register of Historic Places is a fitting gesture, considering its place in Lancaster County education.
    Members of Lancaster City Council think so and unanimously approved a $3,000 request at their April 26 meeting to fund 120 hours of extensive research required for the application process.

  • ‘My mom saved my life, more than once’

    Most of us who are still blessed to have our mothers will likely buy a card this weekend and maybe take our moms to lunch.
    Bobbie Johnston can't do that and hasn't been able to since Mother's Day 2008. This year she put pen to paper, wrote a letter and tucked it in the door of The Lancaster News. She wanted to share her mom's story with someone.

  • Sen. Scott’s bill would boost growth in poor communities

    From release

    WASHINGTON – Sen. Tim Scott this week introduced the Investing in Opportunity Act, a bipartisan bill proposing a new solution to encourage economic growth and job creation in economically distressed communities.
    The South Carolina Republican was joined by Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Reps. Pat Tiberi (R-Ohio) and Ron Kind (D-Wis.) in introducing the bill, which offers a temporary capital gains deferral in exchange for reinvesting those dollars into distressed communities.

  • Lancaster man gets 5 years in federal drug-trafficking case

    A Lancaster man arrested on drug charges in 2014 after jumping from a moving car during a traffic stop was sentenced to more than five years in federal prison Tuesday, the same day the driver of the car pleaded guilty to a federal gun charge.
    According to a statement from U.S. Attorney Bill Nettles’ office, Martiquos Javon McIlwain, 23, of 804 Chesterfield Ave., was sentenced in U.S. District Court to 64 months followed by five years’ supervised release.

  • Mold removal, electric repairs finished at old Kershaw library

    KERSHAW – Now that mold-laden drywall has been removed from the old memorial library on North Matson Street, civic groups and others using the building won’t have to make other arrangements.
    A roof leak caused widespread mildew and electrical problems in the 68-year-old town-owned building.
    Mitch Lucas, Kershaw interim administrator, said electrical upgrades are also complete.
    While the flat roof was coated in a layer of aluminum sealer in mid-Feburary and some worn roof flashing was replaced, the nagging leak persists.