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  • IL library high tech but not space age

    INDIAN LAND – The interior look of the new Del Webb Library at Indian Land will fall somewhere between your grandmother's parlor and George Jetson's apartment.

    "The interior of the building is very contemporary and may be considered by some people to be high tech," said Danny Shelley, the library's architect and interior designer. "It's going to be a little different, but it's not space age.

    "It's not going to have floral carpets like your grandmama's living room. It's not a house," he said.

    But it will be comfortable.

  • Author researches roots in new book

    It wasn't always easy to find a quiet place to write with seven brothers and sisters running around.

    So, when she was little, Rosemary Whitlock would sometimes climb under the kitchen table with a flashlight to find some peace before trying to put pencil to paper.

    "I didn't get stepped on there," she said, with a smile.

    Her mother, who was usually in the kitchen cooking or canning, always made sure her daughter had the proper writing utensils.

  • Reporter leaves Lancaster with some mixed emotions

    It's with mixed emotions that by the time this piece appears in the newspaper, I've left Lancaster County to pursue a new career opportunity in my native area, Louisville, Ky., and return to the roots I love. I look to the future with much happiness and hope, but I feel sadness for what I know I'm leaving behind.

  • Council to discuss library funding, sales tax

    County Council will discuss economic development issues, a proposed 1 percent sales tax, noise at Panhandle concrete plants and funding for the Del Webb Library at Indian Land on Monday.

    Council is expected to vote on contributing $200,000 to the Indian Land library at the meeting after a request from Lancaster County Library Director Richard Band at council's last meeting.

    Band told council members then that he had applied for a grant from the state for the $200,000 to buy books and furniture for the new library, but it wasn't approved.

  • Burns, other educators inducted into Hall of Fame

    Dr. Pat Burns helped create the Lancaster County School District Hall of Fame a few years ago to recognize educators for their many years of dedication.

    Burns, the former district superintendent, is now a member of this distinguished group. She is among a class of four that was inducted into the hall earlier this year.

    The other 2008 Hall of Fame inductees are the late Lafayette Belk, the late Donald Crolley and the late C.D. Williams.

  • March for Babies fundraiser kicks off Tuesday at SMH

    The March of Dimes is gearing up for its annual walk.

    Walk-America, the March of Dimes largest fundraiser, which brought in $117 million nationwide last year, has been renamed March for Babies. The new name makes a clear connection to what the March of Dimes is all about – babies' health.

    "The name of our event has changed, but our mission stays the same - working towards the day when every baby is born healthy," said Phyllis Stroud, executive director of the March of Dimes North Central Division.

  • Berry picked to head up IL library

    "Would you believe it?" she says, with a laugh. She minored in library science, and later received a master's degree in library science.

    Berry said she'll definitely miss the staff at the Lancaster library, which has become her second family. She's worked with county library director Richard Band since he started there 29 years ago. She'll also miss the Lancaster clientele.

  • Builders Supply Co. has adapted to change

    A hundred years ago, people would line Elm Street with their horses and wagons to get ice and coal from Lancaster Ice and Fuel Co. on French Street.

    "It was a really active business," said Chauncey "Bubber" Gregory Jr.

    It was the only ice plant in Lancaster County, and it provided ice and coal to Springs Cotton Mills during its early years.

    Gregory's grandfather, William Thurlow, operated the fuel and ice company.

  • Residents lose power in storms

    Nearly 430 Duke Energy customers lost power in Lancaster County on Wednesday evening as strong thunderstorms swept through the area.

    Most of the outages occurred in central Lancaster, Kershaw, Elgin and Tradesville, said Duke spokeswoman Paige Sheehan.

    Almost all customers had service back by early afternoon on Thursday, except for a "handful," she said.

    "We've basically restored everyone," she said.

    At about 1 p.m. on Thursday, only seven customers were out in Lancaster, with more than 1,400 out between the areas of the Carolinas where the major storms hit.

  • Political newcomer runs for City Council District 4

    A Lancaster native and political newcomer is vying for the Lancaster City Council District 4 seat.

    Tamara "Missy" Green announced her candidacy on Sunday with a get-together at a home on Willow Lake Drive, land that has belonged to her family through the years.

    Green said she deeply cares about the community.

    "It brings me back to my roots," she said Sunday. "This district is truly dear to me."

    About 30 people turned out for the gathering, also attended by former City Councilwoman Linda Blackmon-Brace, who is running for the District 3 seat on council.