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Local

  • HOPE to present gospel SongFest concert at LHS

    You don't have to bring any money to get inside a highly anticipated music concert this weekend.

    All you need is a bag of flour, sugar or cornmeal.

    The first-ever Gospel SongFest, sponsored by HOPE (Helping Other People Effectively) of Lancaster, will be Saturday at the Lancaster High School auditorium.

    The concert is from 4 to 7 p.m. and will feature the local acts King's Cause, Julian Saverance, Roger Anders and the Mount Zion AME Zion Church gospel choir.

    Admission is a bag of flour, sugar or cornmeal, though monetary donations will be accepted.

  • Gas pumps empty across county

    Motorists looking to fill their gas tanks have fewer options these days, as plastic bags cover numerous gas nozzles around Lancaster County.

    All of Brandi Bradley's pumps have been empty since Thursday. Bradley, store manager at the Texaco station at U.S. 521 and the S.C. 9 Bypass overpass, had hoped her latest shipment would have arrived by now, but said her supplier was having a problem locating gas. The owner of her station called Tuesday to say a new shipment was finally on its way.

  • York Tech president gives update

    With a struggling economy, York Technical College's Kershaw campus may be as vital as ever to Lancaster County, according to the school's lead official.

    York Tech President Greg Rutherford gave an update on the college's latest moves and plans Sept. 18 during the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce morning meeting. His presentation focused on the college's local economic impact, increased enrollment and the expansion of course offerings.

  • Reeves took unusual road to the classroom

    KERSHAW – Counting money and handling deposits didn't bring Beth Reeves joy.

    After working at a bank for 15 years, she realized her calling wasn't accounting, but was in the world of education.

    So at age 32, Reeves left Wachovia and went back to school to earn a degree in elementary education. Today, she teaches sixth-grade science at Andrew Jackson Middle School in Kershaw.

  • Buford band spotlights Batman in 2008 show

    Thoughts of one of America's favorite fictional superheroes are sure to surface while watching the Buford High School marching band perform this season.

    Director Alan Bishop has chosen Batman as the theme for this year's marching show. The 2008 Yellow Jacket band has about 45 members this year – a major increase from 27 a year before.

    The songs in this year's show are "The Batman Theme" from the movie "Batman," "The Batman TV Theme" from the original television series and "Batmobile Chase," which is from the movie "Batman Begins."

  • Overtime costs for officers mount

    Lancaster police have logged hundreds of overtime hours to protect the Lancaster County Courthouse and buildings where court records are stored in the city since early August.

    Lancaster Police Chief Hugh White said his officers have spent more than 600 hours protecting key areas throughout the city since the Aug. 4 fire at the courthouse and the Aug. 7 fire at the 6th Circuit Solicitor's Office.

    S.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Jean Toal ordered around-the-clock security for the buildings where court records are stored shortly after the fires.

  • Revised purchasing policy could expedite courthouse planning

    County Council is considering a change in its purchasing policies in preparation for building a new courthouse.

    County Administrator Steve Willis said council will vote on an ordinance Monday night that will bring the county's purchasing policy more in line with the state's.

    The change would expedite the planning and building of a new courthouse.

    Instead of completing plans for a new courthouse before asking for bids from prospective contractors, the county would first ask for qualifications from builders.

  • County may soon use city transfer station full-time

    Lancaster County may soon have a permanent way to ease its trash concerns.

    Lancaster City Council, after an executive session Tuesday, approved a preliminary proposal to move forward with allowing Lancaster County to continue using the city's transfer station.

    The station, located at 1309 Lynwood Drive behind the Lancaster Public Works building, is a temporary holding building where trash is transferred after it is picked up curbside.

  • Q&A with County Administrator Steve Willis on courthouse plans

    Q: What is the status of architectural plans for the new courthouse?

    A: The architect, Stevens and Wilkinson, has drawn up a preliminary plan that includes a rough floor plan and a sketch of what the facade could look like.

    "It's not blueprints or anything like that," Willis said.

    County Council will view the plans this week, and if approved, they will be made public.

    "There's no sense in making the plans public and then council says, 'No way,'" Willis said.

  • Red Cross workers help storm victims

    Local American Red Cross workers continue to help in hurricane-stricken areas in Texas and Louisiana.

    Lancaster resident Robert Summers will soon be on his way home from his duties as a site manager in Houston, where Hurricane Ike hit hard. It's the first time he's ever served as a site manager in a disaster area.

    He coordinated about 107 Red Cross and Southern Baptist Convention volunteers, who helped feed families affected by the storm. The storm knocked out electricity for thousands, tore down trees and blew roofs off of homes.

    Feeding storm victims