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Local

  • Founders president: Credit union's balance sheet solid

    Bruce Brumfield is president and CEO of Founders Federal Credit Union, which has been based in Lancaster since its inception in the 1950s. Here he speaks about the national banking crisis, its effect on the local banking economy and how his institution is weathering the storm.

    Q: How does the current financial crisis affect your business?

  • 3 schools meet federal standard

    Just three of the 15 elementary and middle schools in Lancaster County School District met standards in 2008 for progress under the federal No Child Left Behind Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) measure.

    The state Department of Education released the data last week.

    Because of concerns over possible data corruptions, the department is delaying the release of the high school scores.

    Discovery School, McDonald Green Elementary and North Elementary School met AYP this year.

  • Crowd falls into fun at festival

    INDIAN LAND – It was sunshine and smiles at the third annual Fall into Fun festival in Indian Land on Saturday.

    The festival, which raises money for the Del Webb Library at Indian Land, was moved this year from Sun City Carolina Lakes to Indian Land Middle School. Organizers hoped the move would make the fun more visible from U.S. 521 and draw an even bigger crowd.

    "I'm ecstatic," said ILMS Principal David McDonald. "We've got tons of room and everyone seems to be having a good time. We special-ordered the weather today."

  • Foundation awards adult literacy grants

    The J. Marion Sims Foundation has made awards to 18 different community organizations in its adult literacy and responsive grants programs.

    "Communities in our giving area face a number of challenges on a variety of fronts," said foundation President Jim Morton. "We are pleased to be able to make these awards to deserving organizations for their efforts to meet many of these challenges."

    The foundation has awarded the following adult literacy and basic skills initiatives with grants:

  • $502,000 grant would pay to start new local transportation program

    More Lancaster County residents will have a ride to their medical appointments if the county receives a grant from the J. Marion Sims Foundation.

    County Council will vote Monday to apply for the grant for Lancaster Health Ride, which will provide non-emergency transportation for county residents who don't receive Medicaid.

    Council discussed the plan at its Sept. 30 meeting.

    The grant would benefit senior citizens, as well as low-income residents, said Sharon Marshall of the Catawba Regional Council of Governments, which assists the county in applying for grants.

  • Shooting victim airlifted to Charlotte hospital

    A 15-year-old has been charged after investigators say he accidentally shot his 16-year-old friend on Thursday.

    The 15-year-old, whose name is not being released because of his age, has been charged by the Department of Juvenile Justice with possession of a pistol by a person under 18 and possession of a stolen pistol.

  • Stewart family coping since father's death

    Pamela Stewart says she and her family are coping well following her father's death a few weeks ago.

    Willie Stewart, who founded Stewart Funeral Home in Heath Springs more than 30 years ago, died Aug. 29. He was 67.

    If you didn't get a chance to meet Willie Stewart, his daughters will tell you he was a hard-working man who wanted the best for everyone. Pamela Stewart said those qualities were evident in his work as a funeral home director and through all other aspects of his daily life.

    "He was a good provider," she said. "He always wanted the best for us."

  • Mulvaney says he won't accept reimbursements

    State Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-District 45, said Thursday that he won't accept any reimbursements related to any emergency session of the state Legislature.

    It seems increasingly likely that lawmakers may have to return to Columbia to address budget shortfalls, Mulvaney said.

    "We're in this mess because too many lawmakers in Columbia cared more about pork than principles," Mulvaney said in a release. "That's frankly not a failure you should have to pay for."

  • New business owners see opportunities downtown

    Frederick "Smooth" Hogsett wants to bring a new business perspective to downtown Lancaster.

    Hogsett, owner of Smooth's Music, Books & Gifts at 134 S. Main St., can't wait for his store's grand opening Saturday, not only to unveil the CDs, LPs, books, art and specialty items he'll be offering, but also so he can reveal his innovative approach to his business. That approach, he said, involves providing individual service to each customer.

    "The biggest thing for us is customer service," Hogsett said. "We want to give people what they can't find at Kmart and Wal-Mart."

  • Sidewalk sale to benefit planned Artisan Center

    If you're visiting the first Lancaster Street Market on Saturday, you'll also have a chance to support the local arts.

    The Artisan Center, a nonprofit arts center located in the former Badcock Furniture building on Main Street, is planning a grand opening on Nov. 6.

    In the meantime, the center, which will provide classes in visual arts, theater, dance, music and language arts, needs funding to open its doors.