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Local

  • Buford band spotlights Batman in 2008 show

    Thoughts of one of America's favorite fictional superheroes are sure to surface while watching the Buford High School marching band perform this season.

    Director Alan Bishop has chosen Batman as the theme for this year's marching show. The 2008 Yellow Jacket band has about 45 members this year – a major increase from 27 a year before.

    The songs in this year's show are "The Batman Theme" from the movie "Batman," "The Batman TV Theme" from the original television series and "Batmobile Chase," which is from the movie "Batman Begins."

  • Overtime costs for officers mount

    Lancaster police have logged hundreds of overtime hours to protect the Lancaster County Courthouse and buildings where court records are stored in the city since early August.

    Lancaster Police Chief Hugh White said his officers have spent more than 600 hours protecting key areas throughout the city since the Aug. 4 fire at the courthouse and the Aug. 7 fire at the 6th Circuit Solicitor's Office.

    S.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Jean Toal ordered around-the-clock security for the buildings where court records are stored shortly after the fires.

  • Revised purchasing policy could expedite courthouse planning

    County Council is considering a change in its purchasing policies in preparation for building a new courthouse.

    County Administrator Steve Willis said council will vote on an ordinance Monday night that will bring the county's purchasing policy more in line with the state's.

    The change would expedite the planning and building of a new courthouse.

    Instead of completing plans for a new courthouse before asking for bids from prospective contractors, the county would first ask for qualifications from builders.

  • County may soon use city transfer station full-time

    Lancaster County may soon have a permanent way to ease its trash concerns.

    Lancaster City Council, after an executive session Tuesday, approved a preliminary proposal to move forward with allowing Lancaster County to continue using the city's transfer station.

    The station, located at 1309 Lynwood Drive behind the Lancaster Public Works building, is a temporary holding building where trash is transferred after it is picked up curbside.

  • Q&A with County Administrator Steve Willis on courthouse plans

    Q: What is the status of architectural plans for the new courthouse?

    A: The architect, Stevens and Wilkinson, has drawn up a preliminary plan that includes a rough floor plan and a sketch of what the facade could look like.

    "It's not blueprints or anything like that," Willis said.

    County Council will view the plans this week, and if approved, they will be made public.

    "There's no sense in making the plans public and then council says, 'No way,'" Willis said.

  • Red Cross workers help storm victims

    Local American Red Cross workers continue to help in hurricane-stricken areas in Texas and Louisiana.

    Lancaster resident Robert Summers will soon be on his way home from his duties as a site manager in Houston, where Hurricane Ike hit hard. It's the first time he's ever served as a site manager in a disaster area.

    He coordinated about 107 Red Cross and Southern Baptist Convention volunteers, who helped feed families affected by the storm. The storm knocked out electricity for thousands, tore down trees and blew roofs off of homes.

    Feeding storm victims

  • Mule calfnaps bovine baby at Snipes farm

    A strange love story unfolded at Ben Snipes' mule farm last week.

    The tale involves a maternal male mule named Blackie, and the confused newborn heifer he stole from a herd of Brahma cattle in the pasture he shares with the cows.

    This isn't the first time that Blackie has displayed his maternal instincts.

    He did it two months ago. When separated from that calf, he broke a gate and leapt a fence, breaking the top board as he went over, trying to get to his beloved "foster child."

  • Utility eases water restrictions

    Just in time for the fall planting season, regional water officials say it's OK to use water outdoors two days a week.

    The Catawba-Wateree Drought Management Advisory Group said residents may water their lawns two days a week through Nov. 30. This provides the opportunity for some additional landscape watering during the fall planting season, along with other outdoor water uses.

    Before Wednesday's announcement, residents could only water their lawns or wash their cars one day on weekends.

  • Hood looks to succeed Blackmon in City Council District 1 race

    Kenneth B. Hood says he has the people skills needed to be a good councilman.

    The Lancaster native is seeking the City Council District 1 seat that opened after the death of longtime Councilman Preston Blackmon in August. Blackmon, who was 82, held the seat for more than 30 years.

    Hood said he decided to run before Blackmon died. However, he thought this moment wouldn't come until 2010, when Blackmon's term would expire.

    Hood will face Blackmon's son, Racarda Blackmon, in the Nov. 4 election. The winner will serve the two remaining years in Preston Blackmon's term.

  • Get answers from candidates at Indian Land political forum

    INDIAN LAND – Voters are encouraged to come out to a political forum to learn more about the candidates running for local, state and even national office.

    Carolina Gateway's third candidates forum will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Indian Land Middle School gymnasium. Carolina Gateway is a sister publication of The Lancaster News.

    There will be a meet-and-greet with candidates from to 6 to 7 p.m., followed by the forum.

    The forum is co-sponsored by the Indian Land Action Council and Indian Land Council of the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce.