• Expungements, possible pardons

    Jesef Williams
    Past crimes and convictions can hamper you when it comes to finding a job. Several residents are aware of that and took time out Oct. 8 to learn what they can do about it.
    Doug Barfield, solicitor for the state’s 6th Circuit, gave a presentation that morning about expungements. He spoke during a special event held at Faith, Hope & Victory Christian Church on South Gregory Street in Lancaster.
    Personnel from S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon were there as well.

  • Clay shoot scheduled for Monday

    Jesef Williams
    A sport that hasn’t received much exposure locally is now the main focus for an upcoming fundraiser that benefits an area group home.
    The Lancaster Children’s Home has organized a clay shoot, which will be Monday morning at Meadow Wood Farm, just across the county line.
    The event, called the Fall Flurry, was first discussed in the spring among The Children’s Home board of directors.

  • County has space for Emergency Management

    Christopher Sardelli
    The county's Emergency Management department has finally found its new command center.
    Only minutes after returning from closed session following its Oct. 10 meeting, Lancaster County Council unanimously approved acquiring a building for Emergency Management to move into. Located along North White Street, the building was first built and used by Duke Power, before it was most recently used by Founders Federal Credit Union.

  • Woman hurt avoiding deer on highway

    Reece Murphy
    An attempt to avoid an accident with a deer led to a trip to the emergency room for a Lancaster woman involved in a single-car accident Wednesday morning.
    The accident occurred about 5:30 a.m. as Tammy Starnes, 42, of Old Woodlawn Road, drove southbound on McIlwain Road, S.C. Highway Patrol Lance Cpl. Billy Elder said.
    Elder said Starnes swerved to avoid a deer that stepped out in front of her 2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser, ran off the left side of the road and hit a tree.

  • Changes to affect HS rec teams

     Jesef Williams
     Folks in the Heath Springs area still have a chance to voice concerns about proposed changes that will affect recreation teams there.
    Sherry Wilson, director of Lancaster County Parks and Recreation, said talks began over the summer about consolidating the Heath Springs programs into the Andrew Jackson system in Kershaw.
    That area has seen minimal participation compared to other parts of the county. For instance, there were only enough registrants to field teams in T-ball and fall soccer.

  • Gladys Bell Duncan, 87

    Gladys Bell Duncan, 87

    Gladys Bell Duncan, 87, died Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011.  

    She was the daughter of late James and Annie Bell Reeves Duncan.

    Survivors include a sister, Mildred Duncan McGriff of Orangeburg; and a special care giver, Dorothy Ann Isreal of Lancaster.

    Services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, at Crawford Funeral Home, conducted by the Rev. Gary Steven and Bishop Walker Tucker.

  • Heath Springs teen killed in wreck

    A Heath Springs teen died Monday afternoon in a single-car accident on U.S. 521.

    Lancaster County Deputy Coroner Christy Massey identified the victim as 18-year-old Joshua Smith. 

    Smith is the son of Marybeth and Curtis Smith of the 3900 block of Old Camden Highway.

    The accident happened at 4:10 p.m., about three miles north of Lancaster near Shiloh Unity Road, said S.C. Highway Patrol Lance Cpl. Bill Rhyne.

  • Robber suspect attempts escape

    A Rock Hill man arrested last weekend for a series of armed robberies at local pharmacies can add one more charge to his list of offenses – attempted escape. 

    Ronald Carl Sims, 28, led Rock Hill police officers on a brief foot chase Sunday afternoon after running from the emergency room of Piedmont Medical Center, said Rock Hill Police Lt. Brad Redfearn.

  • A brand new No. 9

    HEATH SPRINGS – Don’t tell Patrick Helms that Thanksgiving is still 37 days away.

    Helms, fire chief at Heath Springs Volunteer Fire Department, will argue that point. And after opening the doors at the new fire station on Sunday afternoon, there may be some validity to Helms’ claim that Thanksgiving came early for the residents of the county’s smallest municipality.

    “This belongs to the town. It’s not ours; it belongs to the people,” Helms said.

  • Council supports lawsuit against election commission

    As next year's national election inches ever closer, state and county officials have begun debating who should pay for South Carolina's Republican Presidential primary.

    That debate hit home recently as Lancaster County Council considered showing support for several counties who are preparing to file a lawsuit against the state's Election Commission. 

    The issue first took shape in Spartanburg County, where county officials have vowed not to hold presidential primaries until primary costs were fully covered by the state.