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Local

  • Cold snap finally ends at 7 nights

    Lancaster County experienced sub-20-degree lows for seven consecutive days, a harrowing cold snap that ended Monday morning.
    By Tuesday afternoon, it felt downright springlike, with temperatures in the 60s and glorious sunshine.
    The Charlotte office of the National Weather Service, which has been collecting data since 1878, matched our seven straight frigid nights, and said that tied for its fourth-longest below-20 cold snap on record. Columbia had six consecutive days, breaking its record of five.

  • Rescuers can’t save horse that fell through ice

    HEATH SPRINGS – First responders worked for nearly two hours Saturday but were unable to save a horse that wandered out onto a frozen pond on Cottage Road and fell through the ice.
    Mike Dazzo with Lancaster County EMS said the dispatch call originally went out as a fallen person, but when paramedic Tony Graham and his partner, Daniel Mahaffey, arrived on-scene, they immediately called for assistance from the fire department.

  • Christie preserving natural, cultural heritage of region

    The Katawba Valley Land Trust has named Dick Christie its new executive director.
    “I’ve only been here a week, but I’ve accomplished a little bit,” said Christie, who took the job at the local land conservancy Jan. 1 after the retirement of Barry Beasley. “I’ve got some pretty large shoes to fill.”

  • Haile mine gives 367 acre tract to KVLT

    KERSHAW – Haile Gold Mine’s owner has donated 367 acres along Flat Creek in eastern Lancaster County to the Katawba Valley Land Trust, adding to the thousands of acres the company has set aside for conservation.
    The tracts border S.C. 265 and Taxahaw Road, with a good deal of frontage along the creek.
    “We’re real excited about the properties,” said KVLT Executive Director Dick Christie. “It’s going to be land that’s protected through best management practices.”

  • Grandmother charged in 3-year-old’s death

    The grandmother of 3-year-old Lilly Schroeder was arrested Friday in connection with the toddler’s beating death last month.
    Tracy Helms Schroeder, 48, of Rock Hill, has been charged with unlawful neglect of a child.
    Schroeder signed an agreement Sept. 1 with the S.C. Department of Social Services to be Lilly’s primary caregiver, according to the arrest warrant.

  • Hard for me to believe there was a time when the races were educated separately

    I reach really high to a top shelf in the Lancaster High School library.

    I grab the light gray, 50-year-old 1967 Rambler yearbook.

    Then I pull down the ’66 and ’68 books, too.

    They’re heavy.

    I carry them to an empty table.

    Though I look like I’m still in high school, I feel the students staring at me like, “What is this crazy newspaper lady doing now?”

    I put the books down and start looking through pages in search of black students.

  • Time for public input on new school’s name

    An online survey to get community input on naming the new Panhandle elementary school and picking its mascot and colors will go live Monday.

    Survey participants have through Jan. 17 to fill out the 11-question survey. After that, the Lancaster County School District will select a committee to discuss the results.

  • Vietnam War flag stops at Lancaster vet’s home

    A traveling flag that marks the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War flew on the flagpole in Cecil and Phyllis Gardner’s yard last month.
    The flag is crisscrossing the nation as part of a special commemoration of the war, stopping once in each state to fly at the home of one Vietnam-era veteran.
    “They’re going to fly it in every state,” said Cecil Elliott, who is a retired Navy chief petty officer who served from 1948-71.

  • SCDOT maps out 2 options for sidewalks near IL schools

    S.C. Department of Transportation has completed a study on cost of adding sidewalks around Indian Land middle and high schools, and now it’s the Lancaster County School District’s job to come up with the money if it wants them.
    School district safety director Bryan Vaughn said if the district decides to go through with putting in sidewalks, construction probably wouldn’t start for at least a year.

  • Chief Grant eager to get more boots on the ground this year

    Lancaster Police Chief Scott Grant has one goal in the upcoming months – getting rid of his department’s long-running manpower shortage.
    “It’s not easy to be a Lancaster police officer. These guys work,” Grant said. “It’s a hard job, and we ask a lot of our folks. We’ve been asking double that because we’ve been working short.” 
    At one time the department had 14 vacancies among its ranks of 39 sworn officers.