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Local

  • Norman cleared by law enforcement officials

    Investigation? Not so fast.
    Despite formal requests from the S.C. Democratic Party on Monday to investigate and prosecute District 5 Congressman Ralph Norman (R-Rock Hill) for pulling out a loaded gun at an April 5 campaign event in Rock Hill, state law enforcement officials have concluded the incident does not merit legal action.

  • The Princes 'Die'aries

    Community Playhouse of Lancaster County and See Lancaster Live presented “Princess ‘Die’aries” at a murder mystery dinner theater event at USC Lancaster March 30.

  • It’s the law: Quick special election no sleight for Howard

    County election officials spent Friday fending off complaints that it was disrespectful to schedule a special election so quickly to fill the rest of the late Mayor John Howard’s term.
    People called in, walked in, posted online and collared elections officials around town, peppering them with indignant comments. The special election is July 10, and the 10-day filing period starts April 20.

  • Henry Johnson, mayor in 1970s, dies at age 95

    Henry Johnson, who served eight years as Lancaster’s mayor in the 1970s, died Friday. He was 95.
    He was elected in 1974 and ’78, serving two terms between Reece Funderburk and Joe Shaw.
    “Henry was a conscientious public servant in every sense, who did us well,” said Charlie Bundy a former president of the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce. “He was a visionary who always looked ahead….                 

  • Winds whip Buford blaze

    Four volunteer fire departments raced to New Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Buford at mid-afternoon Friday when a fire destroyed a storage shed and spread to nearby woods. Thick smoke and ash covered the area as firefighters from Buford, Antioch, Tradesville, Rich Hill and Lancaster County Fire Rescue scrambled to douse flames fed by strong winds, with assistance from an S.C. forestry crew. They were on the scene for about two hours. No one was injured. The church was not damaged, and no other structures were threatened.

  • Storytelling master will spin tales this Sunday

    Everyone likes to hear a good story, and Donald Davis has lots to tell. This Sunday, he will be spinning his yarns at Lancaster’s Cultural Arts Center.
    Storytelling is in Davis’ blood. Growing up in the small mountain town of Waynesville, N.C., he first “got the bug” from his grandmother. He got his own start as an Appalachian “teller” at an early age.
    “I remember by the time I was in the second grade telling other kids in school stories I’d heard my grandmother tell,” he said.

  • Norman: Job incentives in new law great for Lancaster

    Rep. Ralph Norman talked up job growth Wednesday in downtown Lancaster, home to two of South Carolina’s chosen “opportunity zones,” designed to draw private investment to economically distressed parts of the country.
    Ten census tracts across Norman’s 5th Congressional District are among the targets of the new federal program. 

  • Long road to reopen AJMS gets a bit longer

    Andrew Jackson Middle School’s opening has been pushed back another week to April 24 because of scheduling for the final inspection of the extensive fire repairs.
    “I want to say again to parents, students, teachers and staff at Andrew Jackson Middle and at our host schools how much we appreciate all the support and hard work you’ve put into making this tough situation work,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.

  • Mayor Howard dies at 67

    Three months after being diagnosed with lung cancer, Lancaster Mayor John Howard died Tuesday night at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. He was 67.

    “He fought so hard and would have wanted nothing more than to have had more time with his family, friends and beloved city of Lancaster,” daughter Shelley Howard-Robinson said. “Unfortunately, his lungs and body were just too weak, though his spirit was so strong until the end.”

  • John Howard: Quote machine

    Reporters call a politician like John Howard a “quote machine.”
    There was almost never a question he wouldn’t answer, often with a home-spun quip or outlandish analogy. He was passionate – often fiery, sometimes indignant – about how the city conducted business.
    Howard gravitated to olfactory references.
    “This thing is starting to resemble a slop jar,” he once fumed over some governmental calamity. “The more you stir it up, the worse it stinks.”