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Local

  • Chester police chief resigns unexpectedly

    Landmark News Service
    For the second time in just over a year, the City of Chester is looking for a  new police chief.
    Tammy Levister abruptly resigned from the Chester Police Department last Friday.

  • IL man dies in Charlotte shooting

    An Indian Land man was shot dead during a robbery early Wednesday morning as he delivered newspapers in uptown Charlotte, and a second man shot in the same incident has been charged with murder.
    According to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, officers found Walter “Wes” Scott Jr. lying in the street with a gunshot wound about 2:20 a.m. in the 300 block of West Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, near Romare Bearden Park.
    EMS personnel pronounced Scott dead at the scene minutes later.

  • Catawba potter’s exhibit opens at NASC

    Catawba artist Keith Brown will open an exhibit of his pottery at the Native American Studies Center with a reception and gallery talk from 1-3 p.m. Friday.
    The exhibition, “Clay Pit to Fire Pit: From the Beginning to the End,” includes work from the four-month artist-in-residence program Brown completed in December. It will be showcased in the center’s Rose Gallery until Feb. 1, 2018.

  • Grant would target crime in county

    Nearly 30 Lancaster County partners have applied for the federal Building Neighborhood Assets grant, which would be used to reduce crime and improve community safety.
    The $844,168 three-year grant would target areas of high crime within the county.
    “It helps you to create interventions to address crime,” said Dr. Paul McKenzie, Lancaster County School District director of research and development. “It focuses not on criminals but on where crime takes place.”

  • Celebrate love stories of Carolina presidents

    N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

    The relationships of presidents and their wives have been the subject of public fascination for generations. The staffs of President James Polk State Historic Site in Pineville and Andrew Jackson State Park in Lancaster will team up this weekend to look at the relationships of Andrew and Rachel Jackson and James and Sarah Polk.
    The free program will be presented at Andrew Jackson State Park at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18.

  • Ex-GOP chief joins candidates for 5th District

    A sixth Republican has jumped into the race for Mick Mulvaney’s 5th District congressional seat, presuming that he will be confirmed as President Trump’s budget director.
    Chad Connelly, state GOP chairman from 2011-13, announced his candidacy Monday.
    “Washington is broken, and I want to do my part to try and fix it,” Connelly said in a statement.

  • Mulvaney vote likely Thursday in Senate

    The full U.S. Senate is expected to vote Thursday on whether 5th District Rep. Mick Mulvaney will serve as White House budget director.
    According to a schedule released Monday by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the nomination of the Indian Land Republican is one of several likely to be voted on that day.

  • 29 derelict homes targeted for demolition

    Sections of 11 Lancaster streets are looking a little better these days after 14 derelict homes were bought and demolished through a state program aimed at eliminating community blight.
    “This program is definitely doing what it’s supposed to do,” said Louis Streater, director of building and zoning for the city of Lancaster. “These homes were in bad shape.”

  • Judge rules against Richburg man in Doberman case

    Travis Jenkins
    Landmark News Service

    Jordan James Johnson, the Richburg man whose 116 Dobermans were rescued from disgusting conditions on his property, will not be getting the dogs back, a judge ruled on Thursday.
    Johnson, 48, was arrested last September after animal control officers found the dogs living in “grossly unsanitary” conditions. He initially faced 198 changes ranging from ill treatment of animals to violating the state rabies control law.

  • Cops’ mission: Get to know regular folks, their concerns

    Don’t be surprised if a Lancaster police officer just walks right up to you this week and starts chatting.
    Sure, there’s a chance he suspects you of a crime or wants you to snitch on someone, but more likely he just wants to hear what’s on your mind.
    On Wednesday, the Lancaster Police Department rolled out Take Five, a systematic way for officers to connect with the people they protect and serve.