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Local

  • And the winners are....

    David Kellin
    For The Lancaster News

    The audience has spoken and the winners are…
    On Saturday evening, the Community Playhouse of Lancaster County held its annual  Rosie awards at the Carole Ray Dowling Center. 
    Each year, audiences at each performance vote for their favorites in a number of categories. These votes are tallied, awards are created and kept secret until the night of the Rosies.

  • IL woman seeks NAACP Woman of the Year title

    An Indian Land woman is hoping to be named South Carolina’s 2017 NAACP Woman of the Year.
    Through her participation in the 39th annual contest, Robin Massey-Kirk is trying to raise money to support the NAACP’s legal, civic engagement and youth initiatives.
    The winner, who will be announced June 23 at the S.C. State Freedom Fund Celebration in Columbia, is based on whoever raises the most money for the state’s NAACP efforts.

  • Cops & Kids

    It was a regular day of patrolling for Lancaster Police Officer Josh Kelly until something caught his eye – a lemonade stand set up by 4-year-old Kenly Banks in the Forest Hills neighborhood.
    So Kelly decided to stop by.
    “I thought back to when I was little and wanted to do a lemonade stand,” Kelly said. “I didn’t get a chance to do it, so I thought I could stop by and buy one.”
    And he did – paying Kenly $20 for a 50-cent cup of lemonade.
    The job isn’t just about making arrests.

  • Local 4-H summer camps cover all ages, many topics

    Numerous activities are available for the youth of Lancaster and Chester counties this summer, thanks to a collaborative effort from the counties’ 4-H programs.
    Offered through the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, programs are available for every age group.

  • 4-H on the rise

    Scott Miller
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – More youth across South Carolina are turning to 4-H to stoke their interests in science, new data show.
    Participation increased 12 percent last year in the state’s 4-H program, the youth-development arm of the Clemson Cooperative Extension. That follows growth of nearly 10 percent the year before.
    4-H programs cover animal science, agriculture, science, engineering, natural resources, healthy living, leadership and more.

  • District offers free meals for low-income youth

    Free meals for youth ages 18 and younger will be available at four Lancaster County schools throughout June.
    The program is funded by the S.C. Department of Education’s Seamless Summer Option, a USDA meal program that provides meals for children in low-income areas during the summer.

  • Breathless moments boarding cruise ship

    For a hairdresser, the most important skill is wielding scissors and a blow dryer. The second most important is storytelling.
    Cindy Rodgers, owner of Cutting Edge Beauty Salon in Lancaster, is good at both. And she brought a real tale back from her vacation in the Bahamas last month.
    If you run into her, get her to tell you all about it. But in case you don’t….
    “Here I am, this hairdresser from this small town…. Then I get into this major mess!”

  • Christian Services, HOPE sharing old bowling alley

    In a spirit of collaboration, two nonprofits have joined forces to expand their services at the former Lancaster Bowling Alley, which has been empty since last July.
    Christian Services and HOPE have begun sharing the building to broaden their reach to those in need.

  • Kershaw OKs $148K contract for fire service

    Kershaw Town Council renewed the town’s fire service contract with Lancaster County during Monday night’s special called meeting.
    The contract – projected to be $148,922 for the 2017-18 fiscal year – provides the town with two fulltime firefighters for eight hours a day, Monday through Friday.
    Mitch Lucas, Kershaw town administrator, said the town gets the “most bang for our buck” from this contract.

  • S.C. traffic deaths up slightly from last year

    South Carolina has seen a slight increase in the number of traffic fatalities statewide so far this year, according to the S.C. Department of Public Safety.
    As of May 29, 2016, there have been 402 deaths reported on the state’s roadways, up from 396 a year earlier. This year seven have died in Lancaster County.