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Local

  • 6,000 years of culture

    It’s the season of fall festivals, and the one last weekend had familiar sights, sounds and smells – tables full of art and crafts, the aroma of sweet potato pie and hot stew, a full parking lot on a sunny Saturday afternoon.
    But upon entering the glass doors of the long house on the Catawba Indian Reservation, it was clear that something was different here.

  • Wild hogs 'ecological zombies,' cause $115M damage across S.C.

    Scott Miller
    Clemson University

  • Lancaster man tweeted child porn, charges say

    A Lancaster man has been charged with using Twitter to distribute child pornography and faces a potential 20-year prison term.
    Richard Allen Kampen, 56, of 604 N. Woodland Drive, was arrested Nov. 18 following an investigation by the S.C. attorney general’s office and the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Offices as part of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC).  
    Kampen is charged with two counts of sexual exploitation of a minor, a felony offense punishable by up to 10 years in prison on each count.

  • Town that loves trees is in for a shock

    KERSHAW – If the removal of a handful of 100-year-old oaks on North Matson and East Marion streets caused a near revolt earlier this year, Kershaw best get ready for all-out war.
    Mayor Mark Dorman told members of Kershaw Town Council on Monday night that soon scores of trees will be coming down. And just as with the other two incidents, it can’t be helped.
    Dorman said trees along Church Street must be cut down to run a 12-inch water line that will link Haile Gold Mine to the town’s water system.

  • Images of what $199M buys

    Eight months after passing a $199 million school bond referendum, Lancaster County residents can finally see the big-ticket construction projects that the bond money will pay for.

    At Tuesday’s school board meeting, officials unveiled detailed digital images, site plans and building floor plans for the new Indian Land High School and an additional elementary school there.

  • New UDO limits most signs to 10 feet tall

    The signs, they are a changin’. 

    Or they will be if the proposed Unified Development Ordinance passes its third and final reading at the next county council meeting Nov. 28.

    The new UDO, which is finally almost finished after 20 months of reworking, limits most freestanding business signs to 10 feet in height and 40 square feet in area. It’s an effort to reduce visual clutter along the county’s roads.

  • No marauding motorcyclists at Christmas parade

    Motorcycles and horses are in for the upcoming Lancaster Christmas Parade on Dec. 10 and the MLK Day celebration on Jan. 14.

    But stunts such as wheelies, stoppies and burnouts by motorcyclists are out, said City Administrator Flip Hutfles. So are horses without diapers or someone following behind them to tidy up the pavement.

  • School district EOC average below state’s

    State report cards were released this week, showing Lancaster County School District students on average coming in below statewide scores on end-of-course exams and the SAT.

    The 2016 district EOC average, at 70.3 percent, falls below last year’s 74 percent score. This year’s state EOC average is 77.3 percent.

    Indian Land High School scored 82.9 percent on EOC exams, which is higher than the district and state scores. ILHS’s EOC average in 2015 was 84.8 percent.

  • Reward doubles in tombstone vandalism

    The county historical society is doubling its reward to $3,000 for information leading to the conviction of vandals who damaged tombstones at the Olde Presbyterian Church cemetery in August.

    Lancaster Police Chief Harlean Carter said investigators have few leads in the incident. 

  • 36th B&B Craft Show next Saturday

    The 36th annual B&B Craft Show is 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Springdale Recreation Center.

    The craft show will have 56 vendors from the Carolinas displaying their unique items, including wooden handmade ink pins, wickless candles and specialty bows.

    “We come together as a group of crafters and artists, and it never gets old. It’s new every year,” said event coordinator Becky Lowry.