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Local

  • Final call: Kershaw oaks coming down

    KERSHAW – There won’t be a last-minute reprieve for the four majestic oak trees at the intersection of East Marion and North Matson streets.
    The trees will be cut down within the next two weeks, said Kershaw Town Administrator Mitch Lucas.
    The decision to move forward with cutting down the trees came on the tails of a Sept. 8 public hearing on the matter.

  • Prison walls don’t stop phone threats

    A Lancaster man serving prison time on drug charges has been accused of  texting threats to another man using an illegal cell phone, a sheriff’s office incident report said.
    Derrick Antonio McIlwain, 30, made headlines in March 2011 after Lancaster police officers pulled him over for loud music and later found crack cocaine in his car.
    McIlwain was convicted of trafficking cocaine in early 2013 and sentenced to eight years. He is incarcerated at the Turbeville Correctional Institute (TCI) in Turbeville.

  • Heath Springs buying new phones for town hall

    HEATH SPRINGS – Heath Springs Town Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to buy new phone equipment outright for town hall  rather than leasing it.
    The cost of the new phone system from Comporium Communications is $1,945.  Town Administrator Tony Starnes said buying the system made more sense than leasing it for $81.80 a month, which works out to $982 a year. If the equipment lasts more than two years – and Starnes said it might last eight or 10 – buying will end up saving money.

  • Almost back to normal at Lancaster gas pumps

    The local gas crunch caused by an Alabama pipeline leak is almost over, but not quite.
    Officials with Colonial Pipeline said late Wednesday that crews had wrapped up work on a bypass around the leak on pipeline 1 in Shelby County, Ala., and removed plugging devices from both sides of the leak.
    Company officials said though the fuel was flowing again, it might take several days for the fuel supply chain to return to normal on the major pipeline, which moves gasoline, diesel and jet fuel through the Carolinas from Texas to New Jersey.

  • Air Force commander comes home

    John M. McCain, a Lancaster native and retired Air Force colonel, has been hired as the No. 2 official at the new Lancaster County Economic Development Department.
    He’ll start work Monday as the existing-industry manager, reporting to agency Director Jamie Gilbert, who has been working solo since July.

  • Stray cat tortured, 2 players charged

    Two University of South Carolina Lancaster baseball players were charged with animal mistreatment Thursday after an off-campus incident Sept. 10 that led to the grotesque death of a cat.
    Grant Payton Bodison, of Simpsonville, and Joshua Allen Kiser, of Aiken, both 19, turned themselves in to Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office investigators Thursday on one count each of ill treatment of an animal for shooting the cat repeatedly with a BB gun.

  • Gas shortage may ease soon

    by Hannah L. Strong and Reece Murphy/reporters
    The gasoline shortage that hit Lancaster County hard over the weekend and has lingered since should start easing in the next few days, according to the S.C. Emergency Management Division.
    On Tuesday, Colonial Pipeline in Alabama, whose leaking pipeline cut gas supplies across the Southeast, announced that it had finished bypassing the damaged section and gas should start flowing through the pipeline again today.

  • County to save $1M with deal on radios

    Lancaster County Council has shifted the usually slow gears of government into high, trying to take advantage of a deal on the new 800 MHz radios that the county needs to join the new statewide Palmetto 800 system.
    Council has called a special meeting for Thursday morning to consider a resolution allowing the county to sign a purchase order by Friday to seal a deal on the radios that would save $1.1 million. The cost would be $3.5 million, down from an expected $4.6 million.

  • Cardboard Box City combats homelessness

    Autumn begins Thursday, and cold weather will not be far behind, raising concerns about people who have no place to call home.
    Last year on a single night in January, more than a half million people were experiencing homelessness across America, according to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, a leader in service and research on the issue.
    The Lancaster Area Coalition for the Homeless (LACH) hopes its second-annual Cardboard Box City event can help change that reality here.

  • Gas pumps begin running dry

    Hannah L. Strong and Reece Murphy

    Gasoline is becoming scarce and more expensive in Lancaster County due to a leak in Alabama's Colonial Pipeline, and government agencies are cutting back on gas use to weather the shortage.
    Murphy Express on S.C. 9 Bypass had bags over all of its pumps Monday morning, as did a number of other convenience stores. A Murphy cashier said the store received 9,000 gallons Sunday morning and was sold out before close.