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Local

  • Highway named for slain Deputy McCants

    It’s been nearly 25 years since York County Deputy and Lancaster native Brent McCants died in the line of duty on a then-lonely stretch of Dave Lyle Boulevard in Rock Hill.
    Since then, his mother Myra McCants of Lancaster has kept her son’s memory alive through her steadfast support of the law enforcement community, and Tuesday they showed their appreciation by designating a section of the road where he died as the Deputy Brent McCants Memorial Highway.

  • Car hits mom, child at Walmart

    Two peoplepeoplepeople – a 26-year-old mother and her 5-year-old child – were struck by a car Tuesday afternoon in parking lot of Walmart Supercenter, 805 S.C. 9 Bypass West.
    Lancaster Fire Chief Justin McLellan said the child was taken by helicopter to Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, and the mom was taken by ambulance.
    Their conditions were not known at press time Tuesday.
    Lancaster Police Chief Scott Grant said the incident happened about 3:27 p.m.

  • Motorcycle wreck kills McIsaacs of Kershaw

    A Saturday night motorcycle accident on Memorial Park Road killed a Kershaw couple.
    The Lancaster County Coroner’s Office identified the victims as David McIsaac, 61, and Dana McIsaac, 45.
    S.C. Highway Patrol Trooper Joe Hovis said the accident happened about 9:30 p.m. Saturday on Memorial Park Road as the McIsaacs were riding westbound on a 2011 Harley Davidson motorcycle.

  • $2.2M for mentoring college prospects

    The J. Marion Sims Foundation, Furman University and The Duke Endowment on Monday launched a $2.2 million mentoring program for prospective college students in Lancaster and Chester counties.
    The five-year program will be the Palmetto State’s first participant in the College Advising Corps (CAC), a one-on-one mentoring program in 15 states, and will start in August.
    The Sims Foundation and The Duke Endowment will fund the initiative.

  • Rotting playground wood prompts safety shutdown at Kershaw park

    KERSHAW – The Haile Gold Mine Playground at Stevens Park has been closed until further notice after repeated inspections deemed it as unsafe.
    “It was recommended that we close it, and I closed it,” Kershaw Administrator Mitch Lucas said at a special called meeting of the town council Monday night. “We have $115,000 out there that can’t be used right now.”

  • Weekend Recap: April 10, 2017

    A Saturday evening accident on Memorial Park Road claimed the lives of a Kershaw couple, David McIsaac, 61, and Dana McIsaac, 45. For details, see the full story posted on our website or see Wednesday’s edition of The Lancaster News.

  • Kershaw couple killed in motorcycle accident

    A Saturday evening motorcycle accident claimed the lives of a Kershaw couple.
    The Lancaster County Coroner’s Office identified the victims as David McIsaac, 61 and Dana McIsaac, 45.
    S.C. Highway Patrol Trooper Joe Hovis said the accident happened about 9:30 p.m. Saturday on Memorial Park Road as the McIsaacs were riding westbound on at 2011 Harley Davidson motorcycle.

  • Andrew Jackson VI to speak in Lancaster

    As part of Lancaster County’s celebration of Andrew Jackson’s 250th birthday this year, Tennessee Judge Andrew Jackson VI will speak at the Cultural Arts Center this Thursday.
    Judge Jackson is a frequent lecturer on Andrew Jackson at schools, civic groups and at The Hermitage, the seventh president’s historic Tennessee home in Nashville.

  • Lancaster man pleads guilty in federal straw-purchase case

    A Lancaster man has followed his girlfriend’s example and pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to his role in a plot to straw-purchase a firearm.
    Adam Tyler Shrader, 22, pleaded guilty last week in federal court in Columbia to one count of conspiracy to make a straw purchase of a firearm, U.S. Attorney Beth Drake said in a release.
    U.S. District Judge Mary Geiger Lewis will sentence Shrader after reviewing a presentencing report from the U.S. Probation Office, Drake said.

  • Cops, jailers reaching out to understand mentally ill

    Once, when Melanie Odom was at Clemson University, she thought she had discovered a mathematical way to predict the future, and that the government was coming to steal it.
    As a professor was trying to get her some help, she was in an auto accident. She ran across four lanes of traffic, still clutching the sandwich she had been eating.
    “Why are you fleeing the scene of an accident!” yelled a police officer at the scene. As he approached her, she began tearing the sandwich into little pieces and throwing them at him.