• Schools back in full swing

    The hallways of Lancaster County’s schools came to life this week as nearly 13,000 students showed up to begin the 2016-17 academic year.
    Superintendent Gene Moore made his annual rounds to all of the schools on Monday for the 11th year in a row and said the county had a great first day.
    “The first day went very smoothly, and our year is off to a great start,” Moore said.

  • Sneak peek at school

    Incoming freshman and sixth-grade orientations were held countywide Friday to give students a chance to walk through their schedules, learn to open their lockers and even how to show their spirit at pep rallies.
    Sixth grade
    At South Middle School, nearly 200 students wore their new red, white and navy school uniforms and learned their way around the spread-out buildings.
    South Middle Principal Joyce Crimminger’s goal for orientation was to see a smile on all the students’ faces at the end of the day.

  • 2 AJHS students disciplined after incident at camp

    Two Andrew Jackson High School students were disciplined after they acknowledged making a noose out of shoelaces and placing it in a tree at band camp Aug. 5, according to school officials.
    The school was not aware of the incident until Monday, when a band member and her parents came in to complain, said Bryan Vaughn, safety director for Lancaster County School District.

  • Eight file for school board, city council

    Eight candidates, including two challengers, filed for Lancaster County school board and Lancaster City Council before filing closed Friday at noon.
    Three seats are open on both the school board and city council, with one contested race in each.
    School board
    Lorenzo Small will challenge incumbent Tyrom Faulkner for the District 2 seat.
    Small, who is running for the first time, said he looks forward to having an opportunity to provide new insight to the school board.

  • Long days, huge challenges for Gilbert

    Jamie Gilbert knew building Lancaster County’s new economic development department would be a big challenge, but the news he got on his eighth day at work was a punch in the gut.
    Duracell, the county’s seventh-largest employer, announced it would phase out production at its Lancaster manufacturing plant starting next spring, and that all 400-plus jobs would be gone within two years.
    “It’s sure not the kind of news you want to get just starting out,” Gilbert said last week.

  • Kershaw hopes facelift restores course’s profits

    KERSHAW – It’s no secret at Kershaw Town Hall that the town-owned golf course has been bleeding money for about 10 years. In fiscal 2014-15, the course lost $46,000. Last year, the amount tripled to almost $151,000.
    Now town officials are taking a common-sense approach to get the course back on par. They are being proactive in an effort to get back into the black by making it greener and more golfer-friendly.
    Since June, the town has spent an estimated $15,000 to get the 6,031-yard course back into playing shape.

  • Shoelace noose sparks controversy

    Two Andrew Jackson High School students were disciplined after they made a noose out of shoelaces and placed it in a tree at band camp Friday, Aug. 5, said Bryan Vaughn, safety director for Lancaster County School District.
    The noose-like device was two shoelaces tied together, said Bryan Vaughn, safety director for Lancaster County School District. He said two students made the device and hung it in a tree after getting the shoelaces from a third student.

  • Faile fundraiser draws S.C. attorney general

    Beverly Lane Lorenz
    For The Lancaster News

    S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson was one of many Republican officials and candidates who turned out last week to support Lancaster County Sheriff Barry Faile during a campaign event at the Sun City Carolina Lakes Lodge.
    “Barry Faile is a great sheriff,” Wilson told the crowd. “And any opportunity I can have to talk about him, I do it.”

  • Shower truck will aid homeless

    Beneath the surface of our community is an interconnected web of services working to make life better for the sometimes invisible homeless population.
    The strands connect various agencies, churches and volunteers so that one phone call can result in food, clean clothes, resources, and now, even a hot shower for a homeless person.
    Through the coordinated efforts of Lancaster Area Coalition for the Homeless (LACH), local churches and volunteers, a new shower truck will be unveiled at 10 a.m. Saturday at The Life Center, 421 West Gay Street.  

  • Buford’s Page starts 50th year of teaching

    Buford High School math teacher Margaret Page became teary-eyed this week when a back-to-school luncheon turned into a surprise celebration marking her 50th year in the classroom.
    “I can’t stop at 49. There’s something special about 5-0,” Page said Monday to the room full of smiling faces at Hopewell United Methodist Church. The crowd included her family and staff from her school and the district.