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Local

  • State of emergency declared

    Under cold, grey skies with forecasters still calling for significant snowfall, Gov. Nikki Haley declared a state of emergency late Friday to cope with the approaching winter storm, and Lancaster County residents jammed stores buying up ice melt and last-minute groceries.
    As the day progressed, snow predictions increased slightly, and a fine, cold mist was falling.
    “The most recent forecast is calling for 3 to 6 inches of snow, with very little ice,” said Darren Player, the county’s emergency management director.

  • State line change affects four IL homes

    New Year’s Day is traditionally a time of change, but several Indian Land homeowners are facing an immense change this year – as of 12:01 a.m. Jan.1 some or all of their property moved to North Carolina.
    The changes, which affect four houses in the Bridgehampton neighborhood, are the result of a 20-year effort to reestablish the 334-mile South Carolina/North Carolina border.

  • 2017 should see growth, strains on services

    The year began on a positive note for Lancaster County, with a new report showing its per-capita income now in the top 10 among the Palmetto State’s 46 counties.
    And the county appeared well-positioned for continued strong economic growth.
    Jamie Gilbert, director of the county’s new Economic Development Department, predicted 1,200 new jobs and $50 million in new investment will likely be announced within the first six months of 2017.   

  • Brace For Snow

    Frigid temperatures are guaranteed and a blanket of snowfall is likely for Lancaster County this weekend as a blustery storm swings up the East Coast.
    A winter-storm warning is in effect for the county from late tonight through Saturday afternoon. The National Weather Service in Columbia upgraded its watch to a warning Thursday afternoon.
    The snow forecast has changed several times the past couple of days. The latest estimate puts most of the county in the 2- to 5-inch zone. But everyone agrees about the frigid temperatures ahead.

  • No swearing-in for Blackmon, pending appeal

    Linda Blackmon was not sworn in as a Lancaster City Council member Tuesday, and city officials said state law bars her from taking office until a voter-fraud challenge to her election is resolved in court.
    Municipal Judge Bob Davis swore in council members Tamara Green Garris and Sara Eddins, incumbents reelected Nov. 8, at Tuesday night's meeting. But Blackmon, who sat in the audience, was not allowed to take the District 3 seat.

  • 2017 full of milestones

    Andrew Jackson State Park has a lot to celebrate in 2017.
    It’s a milestone year with the 250th birthdate of the seventh president of the United States, 50th anniversary of the “Boy of the Waxhaws” park sculpture and 20th year of the active Friends of Andrew Jackson State Park group.
    Park officials are working to organize an event each month, with the biggest effort put into Andrew Jackson’s 250th birthday celebration March 25. It is dubbed the Golden Sestercentennial.

  • Indian Land American Legion Post 250 growing

    From release

    Indian Land American Legion Post 250’s charter is now in.
    The post has been busy the last two months of 2016. It placed 70 flags at cemetery grave sites. It made a pact with the local Boy Scouts to give Eagle Scout awards. It collected food for the needy and donated about 40 toys to Toys for Tots. The post’s January project will be to collect school supplies for local schools.

  • Meeting on preserving state battlegrounds

    The S.C. Battleground Preservation Trust will hold a public meeting today to discuss the two Revolutionary War sites in Lancaster County – the Battle of the Waxhaws and the Battle of Hanging Rock.
    The 6 p.m. meeting at Buford Recreation Center, 4073 Hurley Walter Road, will provide information and solicit comments, suggestions and recommendations.
    The National Park Service awarded the S.C. Battleground Trust a two-year grant to research the 20 significant American Revolution clashes in the Carolinas and develop precise battlefield maps.

  • Pope hangs up robe

    Jaqueline “Jackie” M. Pope, the first female chief magistrate in Lancaster County history, wore her Judge’s robe for the last time Friday.
    “It has been an honor and a privilege to do this,” said Pope, who is retiring after more than 20 years of service.
    A Winthrop graduate, she worked in the school system 17 years before becoming a part-time magistrate for the town of Kershaw in November 1995.

  • Christmas basket short of $10k goal

    The last donations for the Ward Faulkenberry Sr. Christmas Basket are in with a grand total of $8,465.25, short of the $10,000 goal.
    HOPE (Helping Other People Effectively) in Lancaster, the nonprofit that’s spearheaded the project since 2008, received two donations this week.