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Local

  • 71-year-old woman loses $5K in scam

    A 71-year-old Lancaster woman lost $5,500 this month after falling prey to a phone scammer who told her she had won more than $400,000 in cash.
    According to a Lancaster Police Department incident report, the woman told authorities that she received a call about 4 p.m. Oct. 3 from a “John Newcomer” who told her she had won $440,000, but to collect her winnings, she first had to pay $5,500 in taxes.
    The police report said the man gave the victim a deposit number and a routing number of where to send the $5,500.

  • Murder outside church service

    A Lancaster man was charged Monday with murdering a man who was shot seven times near a church during Sunday morning services.
    Two other men were shot Monday evening less than a mile from the site of Sunday’s murder, but those victims were expected to survive, officials said, and there’s no indication so far that the incidents are related.
    Kenneth Jerome Hood Jr., 19, of 981 12th St., was arrested by sheriff’s deputies about 8:30 a.m. Monday after a foot chase at Palmetto Place Apartments on Pardue Street.

  • Matthew thrashed outside my front door, howling, screaming like something alive

    Editor’s note: Michele Roberts, a former Lancaster News reporter, rode out Hurricane Matthew with her dog, Chewie, in their apartment at Garden City, just south of Myrtle Beach. Here is her account.

    Living at the beach is, for the most part, a fine thing. The ocean is five minutes away, which is simply marvelous.
    I moved to Garden City in March 2015 after living in the Lancaster area for 15 years. Up until now all has been well.

  • Beloved Springmaid Pier destroyed, but resort owner pledges to rebuild

    The iconic Springmaid Pier, obliterated Saturday by Hurricane Matthew, will be rebuilt, its owner said Tuesday.
    The wooden pier, the longest in Myrtle Beach at 1,068 feet, opened in 1953 as part of Springmaid Beach. For generations, it was the site of countless snapshots featuring vacationers from Lancaster and the other old Springs Mills towns. The 36-foot-wide structure, at 3200 South Ocean Boulevard, drew anglers and sightseers alike.

  • Matthew drags on

    The massive cleanup and recovery from Hurricane Matthew were under way Tuesday, with 290,000 South Carolinians still without power and 434 state roads and 27 bridges still closed.
    Interstate 95 was closed just north of the S.C./N.C. border. Fifteen dams, including three in the Pee Dee River basin, had been breached.
    Roads remained flooded in Horry, Dillon, Marion, Georgetown, Florence and Williamsburg counties, as well as in a few isolated spots to the south in the Lowcountry.

  • Main Street scarecrows vandalized

    Police are looking for the vandal or vandals who damaged 11 scarecrows displayed downtown this week for Crows on Main, an annual Halloween scarecrow competition.
    Joe Timmons, events and promotions manager for the city of Lancaster, said the vandalism happened Tuesday night or Wednesday morning.
    “We think it was somebody trying to be funny, but it’s not very funny,” Timmons said. “I think this is the first time it’s ever been this bad.”

  • Brooke Bauer, PhD, comes home to preserve her Catawba culture

    Brooke Bauer grew up listening to the voices of native women sitting in the shade of a huge oak tree in front of her grandmother’s mobile home on the Catawba Indian Reservation.
    The older women, led by her Granny Evelyn George, breathed life into Catawba clay, shaping it into useful cooking vessels and art as they shared stories of struggle and celebration.  

  • Traffic citations fall 43% in a year

    The vacancy-plagued Lancaster Police Department has issued just 753 traffic citations in the first three months of its fiscal year, down 43 percent from a year earlier.
    The department has six unfilled positions on its staff of 39 sworn officers. Despite the city’s moves in the past year to raise police salaries and award signing bonuses, the problem persists. The department hasn’t hired a single certified officer in 2016.

  • Community opens its arms to those fleeing hurricane

    With 310,000 people from the S.C. Lowcountry heading inland this week to escape Hurricane Matthew, it was inevitable at least a few of them would end up in Lancaster.
    Some came because of their connections to the area, while others arrived as part of a planned evacuation. For one family, the stay in Lancaster came as a matter of fate, a safe haven from the storm during a long, uncertain journey.
    The largest single group of evacuees was the 49 residents of White Oak Manor in Charleston who sheltered at the White Oak Manor here.

  • Matthew blasts past

    Hurricane Matthew made landfall north of Charleston at 11 a.m. Saturday as a category 1 storm, cutting power to nearly a half million coastal residents and causing much flooding, but there were no early indications of casualties.
    Lancaster County escaped with a night of heavy rain and moderate winds. As of 11 a.m. Saturday, an estimated 1,200 homes in Lancaster County were without power.
    Darren Player, director of Lancaster County Emergency Management and Fire Rescue said the outages were scattered across the county, caused by trees falling across power lines.