• Target date for playground

    KERSHAW – The Kershaw Community Park Council is aiming for a March 17-30 construction schedule to rebuild the playground equipment at Stevens Park.
    The KCPC is still raising the $375,000 that’s needed to build and install the playground’s components. The nonprofit told town leaders in December that about $112,000 had been raised. This week, they wouldn’t say how close to the total they are.

  • Howard suffers setback during cancer therapy

    Lancaster Mayor John Howard’s condition has worsened after three weeks in intensive care at Carolinas Medical Center in Pineville, where he is being treated for lung cancer.
    Howard has had two successful rounds of chemotherapy and has tolerated the treatments well, but he has suffered a rare, unforeseen complication, according to City Administrator Flip Hutfles.

  • Young women explore STEM jobs with pros who have them

    Nearly 65 professionals and female students from Lancaster County high schools met at Lineberger Construction Inc. on Jan. 25 to encourage women not to be afraid to enter male-dominated career fields.

    Sponsored by Lineberger Construction Inc. and hosted by the N.C.-based Enterprising Women Foundation, the event gave female professionals in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) positions a chance to encourage the young women about their career paths.

  • Eye-opening 20 months in Lancaster ends

    It’s June 21, 2016, and I sit at my soon-to-be-paper-covered desk to write my first story ever as a reporter for The Lancaster News.
    It’s about Anita Watts being named principal of A.R. Rucker Middle School. It’s a Tuesday, a deadline day.

  • Evangelizing around world

    Twenty-year-old Buford resident Samual Purser is a man on a mission, traveling around the world spreading the Gospel to pockets of people who have never heard of it.
    He went to Anchorage, Alaska, last June with two of his friends from Spring Hill Baptist Church in Buford, Trey Macy and Zachary Smith. They planned on a one-month mission trip, but Purser ended up staying all summer, leading Bible study with a group of 12- to 15-year-olds every day.

  • Runoff creates mess in Black Horse Run

    Residents of Indian Land’s Black Horse Run neighborhood are asking for the county’s help in dealing with flooding as a result of development in the area.
    Black Horse Run residents Jason Reeves and Chris Davis made their appeal during the Jan. 22 Lancaster County Council meeting, saying flooding of the stream running through the neighborhood has increased consistently with Indian Land’s growth.

  • Feel the beat

    Sugarshine, Lancaster’s hometown reggae band, showed up Friday at Brooklyn Springs Elementary with 30 five-gallon buckets and 35 sets of brand new drumsticks for the music classes.
    It was the band’s first gift from its newly-formed Make A Wave Foundation. They hope to offer ongoing support to the community’s youth. 

  • IL campaign grows testier as vote nears

    With the vote on Indian Land incorporation coming March 27, groups on both sides of the issue are ramping up efforts to sway the voting public – and it isn’t always pretty.
    Both sides are reaching out to voters with door-to-door appeals, town hall meetings and campaign signs.
    Keeping track of the combatants isn’t easy. On the pro-town side, it’s one organization: Voters for a Town of Indian Land, which has spearheaded the effort for two years. It’s usually called VTIL, but sometimes people call it TOIL, for Town of Indian Land.

  • Soft-spoken trailblazer Eddie Moore

    “I don’t want to be the first black mayor. I want to be the first black mayor who does well and helps grow the town.”
    – Heath Springs Mayor Eddie Moore

    HEATH SPRINGS – When some politicians enter a room, all eyes turn to them, and conversations pause so the speech can begin.
    Eddie Moore isn’t one of those.

  • Column: ‘My Black Is...,’ a prelude to Black History Month

    More than 550 people attended “My Black Is…,” a production of original skits, monologues and choreographed dance routines that enlightened the audience on the contributions of African Americans to history.

    Held at the Lancaster High School auditorium last Saturday, it served as the prelude to events the Lancaster community will host in observance of Black History Month.