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Local

  • A much-loved 28-year-old begins his short goodbye

    Every Southern town has at least a handful of eccentrics – characters who keep the place interesting.
    Pierre Cunningham has spent his lifetime as one of ours. He lives in one of Lancaster’s last vintage mansions and runs his business there. He’s a masterful cake baker, an unbelievably obsessive dog owner, always animated, cheerful and over-the-top confident. He calls himself “the boss.”
    And we will lose him soon.

  • Foundation accepting applications for grants

    From release

    The Lancaster County Community Foundation is accepting applications from eligible Lancaster County nonprofit organizations, congregations, governmental and educational institutions for its 2017 grant cycle.
    In 2016, foundation awarded $4,500 in grants to local nonprofits, including HOPE in Lancaster, Grace Place in Lancaster, The Lancaster County Society for Historical Preservation and Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault. The average grant size was $1,000.

  • Martial arts for autism awareness

    Ashley Lowrimore
    For The Lancaster News

    Free two-week karate classes offered at Kenaki Karate during National Autism Awareness Month received such a big response, the classes were expanded through the entire month of April.
    Held at Kenaki Karate’s four locations – Lancaster, Indian Land, Chester and Kershaw – Kenaki not only had full classes, but also experienced a record-breaking attendance day, with nearly 100 students simultaneously on the floor at the Lancaster location.

  • Indian Land author signs 1st book

    Beverly Lane Lorenz
    For The Lancaster News

    Indian Land resident and first-time author Liz Gilmore Williams held a book-signing event at the Del Webb Library on May 6.  
    Her self-published book, “No Ordinary Soldier: My Father’s Two Wars,” blends creative nonfiction, history and memoir, Williams said.
    And it is no accident that she published her book on Dec. 7, 2016. That was the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.  

  • Elections officials prep for recount

    The recount of Tuesday’s 5th District GOP runoff, won by Ralph Norman by less than a percentage point over Tommy Pope, should begin about mid-morning today in each of the congressional district’s 11 counties.
    “As soon as the state election commission notifies us, we’ll get started,” said Lancaster County Elections Director Mary Ann Hudson.
    Chris Whitmire, S.C. Election Commission spokesman, said Thursday that a mandatory recount will almost surely be necessary after Tuesday’s unofficial vote totals are certified this morning.

  • Time for summer camps

    Our 2017 Arts and Sciences Camps are organized and ready to go for this summer.
    Thanks in large part to grants from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, the Duke Energy Foundation, the John T. Stevens Foundation and Wells Fargo, our camps focus on keeping children engaged in creative learning through courses they choose in the arts and sciences as well as providing a popular, fun summer arts experience.   
    Our goals are to:
    ◆ Offer an exceptional experience for each camper.

  • HOPE offers 2 new ways to get help

    HOPE in Lancaster has added two new programs – the Senior Food Program, designed to immediately help the elderly poor, and the Bounce Back Program, for anyone going through a financial struggle.

  • Panhandle to get 335 more jobs

    Fort Mill-based Unique Loom is expanding its operations to Indian Land, creating 245 new jobs there over the next four years, and moving an additional 90 positions from Fort Mill.
    The company, an online distributor of home furnishings products, has leased the vacant Defense Ventures building at 793 Fort Mill Highway, according to Jamie Gilbert, Lancaster County’s economic development director.

  • Wrecked scrap-metal hauler blocks bypass lanes 6 hours

    The two eastbound lanes of S.C. 9 Bypass at the North Main Street overpass were shut down for more than six hours Monday after a trailer loaded with scrap metal overturned.
    Sgt. Tim Witherspoon of the Lancaster Police Department identified the driver as Brian Dean Stamey of Dallas, N.C.
    The truck cab did not flip over, and Stamey was not hurt. He was walking around talking with police after the accident.
    Witherspoon said the wreck happened about 9:37 a.m. Monday. Stamey works for Kern’s Trucking of Kings Mountain, N.C.

  • S.C. 9 Bypass reopens after metal spill

    The eastbound lanes of S.C. 9 Bypass under the North Main Street overpass reopened to traffic about 4 p.m. Monday. The two lanes had been shut down for a little more than six hours after a trailer loaded with scrap metal overturned just after 9:30 a.m., strewing both eastbound lanes with shards of metal in all kinds, shapes and sizes.
    The truck cab did not flip over, and the driver was not hurt. For more, see the Wednesday, May 17 edition of The Lancaster News.