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Local

  • Blackmon seeks $35K from Harris, county

    Linda Blackmon is asking that Jackie Harris and the Lancaster County Election Commission pay her attorney fees and other costs from the election protest filed by Harris in 2016.
    Blackmon’s attorney Robert Tyson filed a legal motion in the civil court case Oct. 13, seeking $30,000 from Harris and $5,000 from the commission.
    “When there’s a statute, or contractual provision, that allows for the prevailing party to seek costs incurred when the allegations are frivolous in nature, then we will do just that,” Tyson said.

  • Home for heelsplitters

    The population of Lancaster County’s endangered Carolina heelsplitters increased significantly Tuesday.
    Federal workers precisely hand-placed 300 of the federally protected mussels along a stretch of Gills Creek between Pageland Highway and Langley Road east of Lancaster.
    “There’s no big method to the madness,” said Morgan Wolf, an endangered species biologist with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.
    Since 2012, Wolf has been overseeing improvements to the Gills Creek basin to improve heelsplitter habitats.

  • Catawba Riverkeeper releases smartphone app

    From release

  • Solicitor drawing together nonprofits to help drug addicts repair their lives

    The new Sixth Circuit Adult Drug Court Program is partnering with the United Way of Lancaster County to coordinate a network of services to help defendants turn their lives around.
    As part of the effort, Sixth Circuit Solicitor Randy Newman is inviting all agencies interested in receiving program referrals to a network meeting and lunch at noon this Tuesday.
    The meeting will be in the Lancaster’s City Council chambers at City Hall, 216 S. Catawba St. Those interested in lunch are asked to RSVP by noon Monday to Ben Dunlap at ben.dunlap@scsolicitor6.org.

  • New wrinkle for Promise Neighborhood

    Lancaster Promise Neighborhood has knocked on the federal government’s door for the second time after not getting the answer it wanted last year, but this time it’s using a new approach.
    This year’s application requesting nearly $20 million in federal funding – up from last year’s $12 million request – was completed classifying the Clinton Elementary attendance zone as a rural area. Last year we competed in the general category.

  • End of inmate labor will cost county plenty

    Lancaster County is about to lose its only access to low-cost inmate labor, and officials are scrambling to come up with a plan that will avoid hiring county employees to do the work at an annual cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars.
    “It’s going to be a hit,” said Lancaster County Council Chairman Steve Harper, noting the local impact of the November closing of the Catawba Pre-Release Center in Rock Hill.

  • Big Fire Safety Expo this Saturday

    The Lancaster Fire Service is hosting its 23rd annual Fire Safety Expo this Saturday in the parking lot of the Walmart on S.C. 9 Bypass in Lancaster.
    The free event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and marks the end of Fire Safety Week.
    Fire engines and ladder trucks will be on display for children and adults alike. A junior firefighter’s obstacle course, games and prizes, coloring books and a Home Depot kid workshop will be there for children’s entertainment. There will also be a face-painting station, balloons, clowns and a DJ at the Expo.

  • IL lottery ticket worth $200,000

    One lucky customer at an Indian Land convenience store has won $200,000 from an S.C. Education Lottery Palmetto Cash 5 ticket purchased for Monday’s drawing.
    The winning ticket was purchased at a QuikTrip on Charlotte Highway in Indian Land. No winner had claimed the prize as of Tuesday afternoon.
    While the ticket matched all five numbers for the $100,000 prize, the ticketholder “Powered-Up” for an additional dollar. This brought the total prize to $200,000.

  • Tax breaks detailed for new employer

    A home décor distributor that is expanding into Lancaster County won’t have to pay its full share of county taxes for 10 years as an incentive.
    Unique Looms announced in May that it was creating 300-plus jobs in the next four years. Of those, 245 are new jobs and about 90 are moving here from York County. Unique Looms also has locations in downtown Fort Mill and near Carowinds.
    “They’re a great company,” said Jamie Gilbert, Lancaster County’s economic development director, noting that Unique Looms plans to invest $4 million here.

  • Rowell elected national leader of 2,200-paper industry trade group

    Susan Rowell, publisher of The Lancaster News, was elected president of the National Newspaper Association’s board of directors last week during the trade group’s 131st annual convention in Tulsa, Okla.
    Rowell, who has served as a director for five years, said she is personally and professionally honored to lead the nation’s largest newspaper trade association, which represents 2,200 member publications.