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Local

  • Big Kershaw water-line project awaits final OK

    KERSHAW – Town officials hope that another big utility project – running a 12-inch water line to Haile Gold Mine – can begin once the town gets the go-ahead from L&C Railway.
    “All the in-town construction easements have been obtained,” said Kershaw Mayor Mark Dorman. “They’ll be filed with the clerk of court’s office by the end of the month.”
    The town is still awaiting official confirmation from L&C Railway for a construction easement to cross under the railroad tracks along Church Street.

  • Goal: Ease fears on race, policing

    In the wake of violent incidents across the country involving police and young black men, Lancaster County leaders are joining together to hold a public forum Aug. 1 to discuss race relations and police practices.
    The leaders include Lancaster County Councilwoman Charlene McGriff, Sheriff Barry Faile, Lancaster Police Chief Harlean Carter and other county officials, clergy and young people.
    The “Let’s Talk About It” forum will be 6-8 p.m. at Lancaster High School.

  • County receives $40K federal grant for emergency food, shelter programs

    Lancaster County has been awarded $40,181 in federal money to supplement emergency food and shelter programs in the county.
    The selection was made by a national board headed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and involving a number of nonprofit groups including the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army and United Way Worldwide. The federal program is intended to expand the capacity of food and shelter programs in high-need areas around the country.

  • Matson St. water line project hits weird snag

    KERSHAW – Last month town officials announced that the North Matson Street water line project had been completed in about half the anticipated construction time.
    Not quite, it turns out.
    Unforeseen problems have arisen in switching from the old water line to the new one, which means the new line still isn’t completely in service and might not be for another month.
    The switch-over opened a can of worms, or more like a can of pasta, said Mitch Lucas, Kershaw’s interim town administrator.

  • Donations flood in for deputies’ kids

    The hot-dog fundraiser held Wednesday at the historic courthouse for the sons of two county deputies raised more than $13,000 and sold 600-plus plates in three hours.  
    Lunch plates were sold for donations only, and raffles were held for a 50-inch TV, a Yeti cooler and a Walmart gift card.
    “That’s pretty cool,” said Maj. Matt Shaw of the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office, when told the final amount raised. “You hope for the best, but this was beyond anybody’s expectations.

  • Pricey marbles hidden around Lancaster part of global event

    Kevin Robbins is hiding 20 hand-made marbles, some of them worth as much as $100, all over Lancaster as part of a Saturday event called the World’s Biggest Marble Hunt.
    Robbins, a 47-year-old Lancaster resident, is part of a Facebook community with more than 12,000 members around the world. They’re collaborating in this first-of-its-kind event to raise people’s awareness about the hobby and business of collecting marbles.

  • Andrew Jackson State Park holds food drive

    COLUMBIA – State Parks across South Carolina are hoping visitors and members of their surrounding communities will help them pack park trucks full of canned goods and other non-perishables to help address hunger.

  • Lancaster sewer projects move ahead

    Sewer upgrades continue to be a big priority for the city of Lancaster, with several projects moving forward.
    On June 12, Lancaster City Council unanimously approved a $395,202 contract with Fla.-based VacVision Environmental, pending state approval, to reline sewer mains for the first phase of the Midway Neighborhood Revitalization Project.

  • County picks 4 roads for repaving

    Partnerships in and out of Lancaster County are working together to use $950,000 in one-time state funding to resurface four state secondary roads in the county.
    The four roads selected are Rowell Road, Oak Hill Church Road, Musket Road and Craig Farm Road.
    Lancaster County administrator Steve Willis said on average it costs $350,000 to reclaim and resurface 1 mile of a two-lane roadway, but the county will be able to complete far more than $950,000 worth of roadwork because of the partnerships between agencies in and out of the county.

  • Blue lights and a black driver in tears

    Highway Patrol Trooper Albert Blackmon was cruising U.S. 521 in Indian Land about 6 p.m. July 13 when he saw a driver roll through a stop sign near Transformation Church.
    Blackmon flipped on his blue lights, and the two men pulled into the church parking lot. As he stepped toward the man’s car, what the trooper saw set off alarm bells. In the front seat was a 36-year-old black man in “full panic attack.”