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Local

  • Fire destroys local woman’s Gatlinburg vacation spot

    The horrific Gatlinburg wildfire hit home Tuesday night for Lancaster resident Judy McAteer Hammond, who lost the timeshare condo where she has vacationed for the past 20 years.

    “I cried myself to sleep,” Hammond said. “The devastation is unbelievable up there.”

    The condo is in the Tree Tops Resort, located on the outskirts of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in eastern Tennessee. Hammond and her late husband, Mike Payne, bought the timeshare in 1996.

  • Community center gets zoning variance to replace porch

    The city of Lancaster has granted an exception to allow the front-porch cover of the Lancaster Community Center on East Meeting Street to be completely rebuilt.

    The city’s Board of Zoning Appeals unanimously approved a variance at its Nov. 21 meeting that allows the porch cover to be built back as a non-conforming use.

    The variance was good news for the community center’s all-volunteer board of directors.

  • The gang's all here

    Amanda Harris

    For The Lancaster News

    Never before have Franklin Armstrong, Shirley and Peppermint Patty been together with Charlie Brown and the gang to celebrate the Christmas season. 

  • Lancaster bicyclist killed in Gastonia

    A Lancaster man was hit and killed while riding a bicycle in Gastonia, N.C. last Wednesday evening.
    Johney Westberry, 47, was struck by a Cadillac Escalade while riding north on U.S. 321 near Salem Road at about 7 p.m. and pronounced dead at the scene, said Sgt. D. Litaker with the N.C. Highway Patrol.
    Litaker said the driver did not see the man due to lack of lighting on the bicycle and dark clothing.
    The driver stopped at the scene and authorities found no signs of impairment, Litaker said.

  • County council gives UDO final approval

    Lancaster County Council approved the new Unified Development Ordinance Monday night by a vote of 5-1. Councilman Jack Estridge cast the vote of opposition.
    “Lancaster County has changed, and this is an effort to try to manage that growth,” said Councilman Larry McCullough. “I fully support the UDO and applaud all who worked long and hard on this.”

  • Historic courthouse gets holiday makeover

    Nearly 30 members from the Lancaster, Leaf & Petal and Green Gardeners garden clubs joined together Tuesday morning to decorate the outside of the Historic Courthouse on Main Street. Each member brought a bag of greenery and the group worked to make garland, bows and wreaths.

  • Heath Springs faces deadline for hospitality-tax strategy

    HEATH SPRINGS – Heath Springs is getting a hospitality tax Jan. 1. The only question is how much it will be.
    That decision is left up to town council. Unlike the local option sales tax, the hospitality tax does not require voter approval.
    The amount could be 1 percent that goes to the county, 2 percent split with the county or 2 percent that the town keeps. But it’s going to be at least 1 percent.   

  • Carter to retire Dec. 12

    Police Chief Harlean Carter will retire in less than two weeks, after 26 years at the Lancaster Police Department and six years in the top job.
    Her retirement, effective Dec. 12, is for “purely personal reasons,” Carter said Tuesday. She said the decision was difficult, but it was time to "pursue other interests." She declined to elaborate.

  • School board member Brooks charged with meth trafficking

    Lancaster County school board member James M. Brooks has been charged with methamphetamine trafficking after a 3 a.m. traffic stop in Indian Land.
    Brooks and Carol Jean Broom, 37, of Fort Mill, were arrested early Saturday by Lancaster County sheriff’s deputies on Doby’s Bridge Road. Brooks had a substance believed to be meth in his jacket pocket, according to a sheriff’s office press release.

  • Sophisticated electric-bill scam working in Lancaster

    A Lancaster auto repair shop was scammed out of $2,000 this week when a caller  threatened to cut off the electricity unless the business immediately paid an overdue power bill.

    “In this instance, we had a small business where employees were working away and got an unexpected phone call,” said Lancaster Police Capt. Scott Grant. “You know that you’ve got to have power to stay in business, and they get you before you have time to realize what happened.”