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Local

  • Changes for big IL festival

    Indian Land’s Fall Festival will face many changes this year, including new leadership, a later date and some higher vendor booth fees.
    The Indian Land Rotary Club decided not to lead the Indian Land Fall Festival this year as it has done for the past 10 years.
    Started as a way to help build the Del Webb Library at Indian Land, the annual festival is now its own official nonprofit, co-chaired by Michael Neese and Richard Warrin, with Robin Hensel as festival director.

  • Sewage spill fouls Catawba River

    Environmental officials are warning the public to avoid recreational use of parts of the Catawba River after a broken pipe in south Charlotte dumped 200,000 gallons of raw sewage into a Sugar Creek tributary on Friday.
    Adrianna Bradley, spokeswoman for the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, said modeling conducted by the department indicated the spill passed downstream of Landsford Canal State Park Monday night.

  • Weekend Recap: July 17, 2017

    Sewage spill pollutes Catawba River

    Staff reports

    S.C. DHEC and environmental officials are warning the public to avoid recreational use along parts of the Catawba River after a broken pipe in south Charlotte dumped as much as 200,000 gallons of raw sewage into a Sugar Creek tributary Friday.

    DHEC spokeswoman Andrianna Bradley said the department posted signs at the Landsford Canal State Park and the Catawba Indian Nation launch, warning of the potential for bacterial infections due to the spills.

  • Super-sniffer service dog will check student’s glucose levels

    By Kelly Morrissette
    For The Lancaster News

    Coleman Joyner’s family has three dogs already, but the next one will be his alone – a service dog trained to detect changes in his blood glucose levels and send out an alert when he needs attention.

  • Recreation, access improvements planned along Catawba-Wateree

    Page Leggett
    Duke Energy Illumination  

    Of all the new amenities and expanded access planned for the Catawba River and its lakes, trails and parks, an additional restroom is among the conveniences people are most excited about.

  • Pageland won’t decide on reinstating top cops until it receives SLED report

    Don Worthington
    Landmark News Service

    Pageland’s top two police officers will remain on paid administrative leave as the town council waits for a state investigative report about the allegation that they broke into an employee’s home.
    After deliberating for about an hour Tuesday in closed session, the council voted to keep Police Chief Craig Greenlee and Capt. Dean Short on paid leave until the town receives the report from the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division.

  • Don't let that tick make you seriously sick

    In summer 2003, Missy and Michael Stogner of Lancaster’s Antioch community were desperate to know the cause of their 3-year-old daughter Kaytlin’s illness.
    Pediatricians said she had a viral infection that had to “run its course.”
    But the flu-like symptoms lingered and worsened, her nausea and lethargy so bad she couldn’t get off the couch, muscle pain so deep even a soothing touch hurt and a fever so intense it smoldered for a week between 103 to 104 degrees.

  • Dealing with deaths

    This is turning out to be an unusually deadly year for young people in Lancaster County, with six deaths in the 15-to-25 age group so far, most of them homicides.
    In all of 2016, just one person that age died in the county, a suicide.
    “It’s just tragedy upon tragedy,” said Lancaster Police Chief Scott Grant. “Nobody, including us, can make sense out of it.”
    Four of the six deaths have been homicides. There’s been one suicide, and another case is still under investigation.

  • Investigating cases, comforting families

    Lancaster County Coroner Karla Deese will never forget June 29, the night Markevis Foster and Rakeem Patterson were murdered in a drive-by shooting at Palmetto Place apartments.
    When she got to the emergency room at Springs Memorial Hospital, a large crowd had gathered outside to await news. Inside the ER, the atmosphere was frantic.
    “There was just a sense of almost desperation,” Deese recalls. “You knew when you walked in the door that the whole staff was banding together in a desperate effort to save lives.”

  • Pierre musters fading strength, dogs get their bash

    Pierre Cunningham was all smiles as he celebrated the birthdays of both of his “boys,” Malcolm and Scooter, perhaps for the last time.
    Malcolm turned 1 in January and Scooter will be 6 in October. The dogs live with Cunningham at the historic Edwards Scott House in Lancaster, which was decorated from floor to ceiling Saturday in a Paw Patrol theme. Puppies and children ran through the halls.
    “They had a grand time,” Cunningham said.