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Local

  • $1,000 reward in horse’s killing

    The owners of a horse that died from an apparent gunshot last month are offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to a conviction in the case.
    Julie and Robbie Dunn told the story of their 28-year-old gelding, Boss, in the Dec. 1 edition of The Lancaster News.
    The incident happened the morning of Nov. 18 at the Dunn ranch on Old Church Road near the intersection of U.S. 521 and S.C. 5.
    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office is helping the Dunns spread the word about the reward.

  • County to preserve stonework at old jail

    The hand-hewn stonework recently discovered beneath decaying stucco will be preserved as the new exterior walls of the historic Lancaster County Jail on West Gay Street.
    Because of the 194-year-old building’s historic status, the county must get approval from the S.C. Department of Archives and History and from the U.S. Department of the Interior before finalizing the change.
    “I can’t imagine anyone saying no because we’re going to be taking it back to how it looked when it was built,” said County Administrator Steve Willis.

  • Hanukkah vandalism

    Hundreds of neighbors from various faiths came together this week to support an Indian Land couple whose Hanukkah decorations were vandalized for the third time in four years.
    The latest incident happened overnight Dec. 6, when someone sliced the cords of Barry and Lexy Greene’s blue and white Hanukkah lights, electric menorah and other holiday decorations in front of their home. The same thing happened in 2014 and 2015.

  • Correction

    Incorrect information from county officials resulted in an error in Friday’s article about Indian Land subdivision developers arranging to have their roads accepted into the county system. Rosemont’s developer has contacted county officials about meeting a Dec. 31 paperwork deadline and plans to submit its documents on time.
     

  • A White House Christmas

    Denise Johnston
    For The Lancaster News

    A “snowball” fight, a kissing ball, mincemeat pies and presidential dinnerware were all part of a delightful historical program at Andrew Jackson State Park on Saturday, Dec. 2. 
    Although titled “1830s Christmas in the White House,” this special event also included details of modern holidays at the presidential residence as well.

  • Wreath-laying for vets at Kershaw city cemetery Saturday

    KERSHAW – For the ninth straight year, Kershaw is participating in the holiday season National Wreaths Across America Day.
    At noon Saturday, volunteers will place wreaths on the graves of more than 500 veterans buried at Kershaw City Cemetery.
    It’s part of an annual effort that places more than 1.2 million wreaths on veterans’ markers at 1,230 locations.
    This year, more than 200,000 wreaths will be placed at Arlington National Cemetery alone.

  • Volunteers double space for Grace Place nonprofit

    Volunteers and community supporters celebrated Monday at the Grace Place after-school program, which has doubled the space in his Brooklyn Avenue facility.
    The new nearly 500-square-foot room, remodeled by YouthBuild students, will allow more space for volunteers to read one-on-one with students without the distraction of an overcrowded room.
    “It’s wonderful to know we have doubled the space we had so we can accommodate children,” said Carol Lee, one of two Grace Place directors. “We’ve just had so many people give their time.”

  • Warming center for women, kids will open Jan. 2

    Homeless women and children in Lancaster will have a warm place to sleep this winter, as renovations are almost finished on a temporary shelter next door to the Citadel House men’s shelter.
    The house at 1232 Trestle Lane is scheduled to open Jan. 2. It will accommodate 10 to 12 women and children each night through March. The warming center will run from 6 p.m.- 8 a.m. An evening meal will be provided, and hopefully breakfast and a bag lunch.

  • 7 IL subdivisions off the hot seat

    Developers of seven Indian Land subdivisions sprang to attention after last month’s ultimatum from county officials – make financial arrangements by Dec. 31 or your homeowners will forever be responsible for fixing their own roads.
    Six developers are in the process of providing the required letters of credit that would allow the county to accept their roads into the county system, while a seventh may get a waiver.
    But county officials still haven’t heard back from the developers of the remaining two subdivisions – Rosemont and Reid Pointe.

  • Clarification on incorporation news article