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Local

  • Sheriff’s office lists unclaimed property

    Deputies with the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office often come across unclaimed, lost or abandoned property during the course of their duties.
    Under county policy, when a deputy takes possession of such property, it is placed into evidence for safekeeping.   
    The office works to identify owners and reunite them with their property. 
    After a 90-day period and exhausting all reasonable efforts to find legal property owners, the sheriff’s office is allowed by state law to dispose of the items.

  • SCDOT holiday roadside assistance is now a bit easier

    From release

    Contacting S.C. Department of Transportation roadside assistance crews has become a little easier, just in time for holiday travel.
    The SCDOT has added a new feature on its 511 App to allow motorists to contact State Highway Emergency Program. Selecting the “SCDOT SHEP Roadside Assistance” tab connects users with the closest dispatch phone number.
    The program has helped about 800,000 motorists across the state since its inception in 1996.

  • Christmas Basket Fund donations top $3,000

    Two weeks after its kickoff, the Ward Faulkenberry Sr. Christmas Basket Fund is a third of the way to its goal.
    The fundraising drive, organized by HOPE in Lancaster,  had raised more than $3,000 as of Friday afternoon. This year’s goal is $10,000.
    The money raised will go toward 400 Christmas meal food boxes prepared for families in need. Those families will be chosen through local agencies and HOPE’s Senior Food Pantry.

  • Devastating fallout for towns

    If you live in Lancaster, Heath Springs or Kershaw and think you don’t have a dog in the Panhandle incorporation fight, you are mistaken.
    Incorporation by Indian Land would directly affect taxpayers in the county’s other towns because the new municipality would be far more populous and would suck up a large majority of Local Option Sales Tax revenue.
    Raised through a local 1-cent sales tax, LOST money is used to provide tax relief for local homeowners through property-tax credits.

  • CBS series ‘Lucky Dog’ brings rescued terrier to Lancaster home

    Scout, a frisky 4-month-old poodle terrier, scooted between the legs of Lancaster executives and one TV star at Nutramax Laboratories’ warehouse on Flat Creek Road.
    Brandon McMillan, the host of CBS’ Emmy-winning Saturday morning show “Lucky Dog,” was sitting at a conference table with Nutramax CEO Dr. Todd Henderson and veterinarian Dr. Robert Devlin.
    The executives in business suits broke out in smiles as they twisted and turned in their chairs to give the black-and-white terrier a pat on his head.

  • Rotary Club cookbooks on sale now

    The Lancaster Rotary Club has published its first-ever cookbook to raise money for its charitable projects.
    Rotary member Danelle Faulkenberry brought all of the local recipes together. She said the book is a combination of the club’s recipes and its history and memories since its founding in 1942. Most of the recipes in the book are simple and require only three to five ingredients to complete.

  • Postal service gets another earful on IL post office location

    U.S. Postal Service officials attended yet another tough meeting with Indian Land residents Tuesday night on the latest proposal for an Indian Land post office.
    The meeting at the CrossRidge Auditorium came about three months after a raucous meeting at Indian Land’s York Tech Campus about a proposed site on Rosemont Drive near the Rosemont subdivision.

  • Kershaw News Era publisher dies at 66

    Jim McKeown Jr., owner, editor and publisher of the Kershaw News Era for three decades, was found dead Thursday in his home. He was 66.
    McKeown, who came from a newspaper-industry family, was known for his columns and hard work at the paper.
    “He was the paper,” said Kim Roberts, a 16-year freelancer for the Kershaw News Era. “He had ink in his blood.”
    Roberts said McKeown called him after the sports editor died of cancer two days before football season started.

  • Paperless voting leaves S.C. vulnerable

    South Carolina is one of only five states whose voting machines create no paper trail that could be used to reconstruct the balloting if hackers found a way to change votes in an election.
    The state has used its touch-screen system since 2004, when Congress spent $4 billion to upgrade systems across the country. That eliminated punch-card systems like the one plagued by “hanging chads” in the crucial Florida recount of the 2000 Bush-Gore race.

  • Van Wyck kicks off Christmas

     In its first year as a town, Van Wyck will be ringing in the holiday spirit this weekend with a Christmas parade at noon Saturday and candle-lighting worship event beginning at 4:30 p.m. Sunday.
    The parade will celebrate South Carolina’s youngest town with Mayor Sean Corcoran and town council members Bob Doster, Xavier Kee, Richard Vaughan and Cassandra Watkins as grand marshals.