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Government

  • Municipal court to alter work schedules

    There will be several changes to the work schedules for the city of Lancaster’s court employees – moves that are said to improve services and provide more accessibility.
    Municipal Court Administrator Darlene Whitley proposed that all of the department’s employees move to a four-day, 10-hour-per-day work week.
    That allows a judge to be off on either on Monday or Friday, giving that person a three-day weekend.

  • City gives Hope on the Hill $25K

    Tuesday wasn’t the first time the Rev. Wayne Murray approached City Council with a host of concerns regarding hospitality tax grant funding.  
    Murray is chairman of Hope on the Hill, a youth-service organization that is renovating the old Barr Street High School auditorium and gymnasium to be used as a multi-purpose community center.
    Though Hope on the Hill has received $125,000 from the city in the past, he was disappointed the organization had been turned down for funding multiple times since then.

  • Council approves animal ordinance

    After months of disagreements and debate about the enforcement of a code for dangerous animals, Lancaster County Council finally settled on a revised ordinance Monday night.
    Before voting, council discussed the issue at length along with Lancaster resident Derek Smith, who has appeared before council several times over the last five months to oppose the revision.
    Smith maintains the newly worded ordinance would be detrimental to animal owners.

  • McCoy changes address

    One of the candidates who ran for the District 16 state Senate seat has since moved back outside the district. 

    Rob McCoy, who sought the Republican nomination, has changed his permanent address from Lancaster to Heath Springs, according to the S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles. 

    He completed an application for voter registration form from the DMV, requesting a change to 2460 Fork Hill Road in Heath Springs. 

    The form was signed Feb. 28 – six days after Greg Gregory won the District 16 primary. 

  • Six county departments on the move

    Lancaster County officials provided more details last week for a plan to relocate the offices of at least six county departments. 

    During Lancaster County Council’s March 1 meeting, county staff narrowed down plans for moving around several departments and groups, including the assessor’s office, finance department and the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. (LCEDC). 

    The discussion began last month as council discussed what to do with the LCEDC, whose building on West Gay Street is prone to mold and water leaks. 

  • Cost increase for improvements at city wastewater treatment plants

    The total cost for improvements at the city of Lancaster’s wastewater treatment plant has gone up, though officials say the increase will save the city a lot of money in the future. 

    Mack McDonald, the city’s public utilities director, gave an update on work at the plant during City Council’s meeting Tuesday night. 

    Turner Murphy Construction of Rock Hill is installing four new 150-horsepower effluent pumps, which send wastewater from the Lockwood Lane treatment plant to the Catawba River. 

  • City sets start date of fire hydrant testing

    The Lancaster Fire Department has set a start  date of April 4 for its semi-annual fire hydrant testing throughout the city limits.

    The testing will continue throughout April and May. 

    All city fire hydrants will be tested to ensure they operate properly and produce the required water pressure when needed to fight fires. 

    The hydrant testing must be done during normal operating hours. 

    It is impossible to know in advance where or when testing will take place in any specific area. 

  • Group organizes to oppose landfill

    More than 120 county residents gathered at the Rich Hill Volunteer Fire Department on Friday night to organize opposition to a proposed solid waste landfill in the Flat Creek area.
    Billed as the first meeting of the Lancaster County Action Council, residents gathered to oppose the idea of changing the use of the Mineral Mining Landfill off S.C. 903 from a construction and demolition landfill to a solid waste landfill.

  • Names sought for veterans monument

    HEATH SPRINGS – A project to permanently honor past military servicemen and woman is coming along well, organizers say.
    David Williams of the Heath Springs Veterans Association gave Heath Springs Town Council an update Tuesday on plans for a veterans monument at the corner where the old water tower stood, facing North Main Street.
    The veterans association formed a special committee about 18 months ago to began planning for the granite monument, which will feature names of late Lancaster County residents who served in any branch of the military.

  • Fort Lawn seniors will continue to meet, eat

    Travis Jenkins
    Landmark News Service
    FORT LAWN – When the decision was made last week to close the Fort Lawn Senior Center, the town’s mayor and Chester County leaders immediately sprang into action to seek alternatives to keep the center in operation.
    On Tuesday,  York County Council on Aging Director Wendy Duda informed  Chester County Council members that due to budget shortfalls and attendance numbers, the Fort Lawn Senior Center will close.