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Government

  • Proposed Family Dollar raises ire of Elgin residents

    Robert Wade worries a new Family Dollar store near his Elgin home will mean an increase in crime.

    Rachel Wallace is concerned about what kind of store could move in to the building if the Family Dollar should happen to fail.

    And Carolyn Petroski, who enjoys the rural landscape of her community, fears the business could irrevocably harm her way of life.

  • County's B-3 overlay committee votes to disband

    A Panhandle rezoning plan is in flux once again, as a special committee tasked to clear up zoning concerns in the northern part of the county voted to disband last week.

    The Panhandle/B-3 Overlay Committee, made up of various residents, Lancaster County Council members and representatives from the county planning department, held its last official meeting last week.

    District 1 County Councilman Larry McCullough said the committee had delivered what it had been set up to do and he recommended it disband.

  • County Council extends rezoning moratorium

    A proposed zoning plan for the Panhandle was stopped in its tracks last week, as Lancaster County Council decided to instead extend its rezoning moratorium.
    The original plan for council’s Feb. 27 meeting was for members to hear first reading of an ordinance to add several business zoning classifications to the county’s Panhandle area.

  • City awards $50K to Barr Street center

    The city of Lancaster is once again giving financial support to Hope on the Hill.
    City Council voted unanimously Feb. 28 to award the organization $50,000 to be used for  renovations of the former Barr Street school, now called the Barr Street Family Life Center.
    The $50,000, which is specifically targeted for auditorium repairs, will come from the city’s hospitality tax grant fund.
    That fund contains a little more than $1 million, said city Administrator Helen Sowell. Grants are given to events and projects that can foster tourism.

  • McCullough to run again

    Larry McCullough campaign
    INDIAN LAND – Republican incumbent District 1 County Councilman Larry McCullough, 60, announced this weekend he is seeking re-election for Lancaster County Council.    
    McCullough’s two an-nouncements, one Saturday at 521 BBQ & Grill and another Sunday at The Lake House in Sun City Carolina Lakes, were attended by more than 100 enthusiastic supporters, many of whom signed up to volunteer with the campaign.  

  • Asbestos found in Badcock building

     Plans to make Main Street Lancaster the local hub for Native American studies have been delayed with the discovery of asbestos in a key building. 

    City Administrator Helen Sowell on Monday confirmed that asbestos has been detected in the former Badcock furniture store building, 119 S. Main St., that will now serve as the home for University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Native American Studies program. 

  • Rob Petrucci takes over as new EMS director

    It’s a long way from Las Vegas to Lancaster, but Rob Petrucci, 42, and his family packed up and made the trip to start his new job as director of Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services. His first day was June 15.
    Coming here was not as big a leap as you might think. Petrucci found his calling while he was doing undergraduate studies at California-Polytechnical College in San Luis Obispo, Calif. He got involved with the EMS there, and has been at it ever since.

  • Municipal court to alter work schedules

    There will be several changes to the work schedules for the city of Lancaster’s court employees – moves that are said to improve services and provide more accessibility.
    Municipal Court Administrator Darlene Whitley proposed that all of the department’s employees move to a four-day, 10-hour-per-day work week.
    That allows a judge to be off on either on Monday or Friday, giving that person a three-day weekend.

  • City gives Hope on the Hill $25K

    Tuesday wasn’t the first time the Rev. Wayne Murray approached City Council with a host of concerns regarding hospitality tax grant funding.  
    Murray is chairman of Hope on the Hill, a youth-service organization that is renovating the old Barr Street High School auditorium and gymnasium to be used as a multi-purpose community center.
    Though Hope on the Hill has received $125,000 from the city in the past, he was disappointed the organization had been turned down for funding multiple times since then.

  • Council approves animal ordinance

    After months of disagreements and debate about the enforcement of a code for dangerous animals, Lancaster County Council finally settled on a revised ordinance Monday night.
    Before voting, council discussed the issue at length along with Lancaster resident Derek Smith, who has appeared before council several times over the last five months to oppose the revision.
    Smith maintains the newly worded ordinance would be detrimental to animal owners.