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Government

  • City to permit beer sales at Red Rose Festival

    This year’s Red Rose Festival will feature something extra for adults.

    Lancaster City Council voted 6-1 at its Tuesday, April 10, meeting to approve a resolution that permits the sale and consumption of beer at the upcoming festival on May 18 and 19.

    Councilwoman Linda Blackmon-Brace cast the dissenting vote.

    In November 2011, council revised an existing ordinance, to allow beer and wine to be sold at city-sponsored functions. However, a vendor must apply and be approved for each event.

  • City delays pole shed construction

    Money has been redirected in a way that may improve operations at the city of Lancaster’s building on 15th Street.

    Jerry Crockett, the city’s public works director, requested a funding change at City Council’s Tuesday, April 10, meeting.

    As part of the city’s capital-improvement plan (CIP), $30,000 had been set aside this budget year for the construction of a pole shed. Crockett said he’s realized it will take another $35,000 to complete the project.

  • Council considers community needs list

    Highway improvements, neighborhood revitalization and upgraded EMS and fire stations remain some of the top priorities for county officials.

    Those were just some of the many projects mentioned during a needs assessment public hearing at Lancaster County Council’s April 2 meeting.

    Held annually, the hearing is used to gather information and compile a community-needs list for Lancaster County, with help from the Catawba Regional Council of Governments. 

  • Council wants more info before funding 4-H agent position

    The fate of a local 4-H position hangs in the balance as Lancaster County Council considers whether to continue its funding. 

    That funding – $35,000 – provides a 4-H agent through the Clemson University Extension Service. It has been funded for decades, though council members discussed the feasibility of renewing the contract at its April 2 meeting. 

  • Filing wraps up for June primaries

    A woman familiar with congressional politics will challenge U.S. House Rep. Mick Mulvaney for the District 5 seat – one of several races office seekers filed for over the past few weeks.

    Joyce Knott, a Rock Hill businesswoman who once worked on the campaign staff for former U.S. Rep. John Spratt, has filed to run as a Democrat for that same seat in the June primary.

    That will presumably pit her against Mulvaney, the incumbent Republican, in November’s general election. 

  • Airport business park moves forward

    The approval of a new resolution by Lancaster County Council this week has kick-started progress on a new Lancaster Airport Business Park project.

    Following council’s closed session Monday, April 2, council members voted unanimously to approve Resolution 775, allowing for the purchase of several acres of land near the county’s airport. The resolution also begins the county’s due diligence process for eventually buying 100 more acres of land.

  • Tony Starnes to step down in Kershaw

    KERSHAW – The town of Kershaw is now looking for a new administrator.

    Tony Starnes, who’s held the position since September 2003, announced this week that he is resigning. His last day  is April 30.

    Starnes, 62, said he’s ready to step aside. This will give him the opportunity to “either do something else” or simply enjoy himself while spending more time his family.

    “After you work so long, you get to the point where you’re ready to go,” he said.

  • Mayor calls councilwoman out of order

     

    City Councilwoman Linda Blackmon-Brace says Mayor Joe Shaw needs to grow up – an assertion that followed his dismissal of her motion to give city employees more money.

    During the Tuesday, March 27, City Council meeting, Blackmon-Brace made a motion to give each city of Lancaster employee a $75 stipend (pay supplement) each month for the remainder of the budget year, which ends June 30.

    The move came during a discussion about the 2012-13 budget-planning schedule, which was led by Finance Director James Absher.

  • Heath Springs council discusses security package for Town Hall

    HEATH SPRINGS – Most of the talk at town council’s March 20 meeting centered on protection for Town Hall – whether it’s from insects or burglars.

    Council voted unanimously that evening to accept a bid from Rollins Pest Control of Jefferson.

    For $1,500, the company will install termite bait traps at the recently renovated Town Hall on Duncan Street. And for $485, the company will perform once-a-year monitoring and servicing.

  • Kershaw applies for CDBG grant

    KERSHAW – The application has been sent. And now Kershaw officials have to wait to find out if they’re selected.

    Since last year, the town of Kershaw has been eyeing a $500,000 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). If awarded, that federal money will pay for the replacement of old water lines in the Springs cotton mill village neighborhood, just north of the town limits.

    The town provides water for that area, which includes roads such as First, Second, Third and Fourth streets.