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Government

  • Council holds pat on landscaping requests

    HEATH SPRINGS – After discussing three landscaping matters in executive session during a special meeting on Monday, Oct. 26, members of Heath Springs Town Council took action on two of them.
    Council voted unanimously not to sow winter rye grass on public property and not to pay landscaper Darren Sowell an additional $1,472 for 184 bales of pine straw he placed in the town early this year.

  • Council to discuss unbuilt condos, townhouses with Pulte

    Should the county be compensated for lost tax revenue from several agreed upon, but still unbuilt, condominiums and townhouses inside Indian Land’s massive Sun City Carolina Lakes neighborhood?
    That question was at the heart of a debate among Lancaster County Council members on Monday, Oct. 26, as they discussed how to proceed with the neighborhood’s developer, Georgia-based Pulte Group.  

  • LCEDC board member upset audit not on council agenda

    Though he only had three minutes to speak to Lancaster County Council during its meeting Monday night, Oct. 26, John Baker made the most of every second.
    As the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp.’s board vice-chairman, Baker was upset his organization’s latest audit wasn’t included on council’s agenda for discussion. And without a designated time to present the audit in full, Baker decided to claim his allotted three minutes of speaking time during the citizen comments portion of the meeting.

  • Kershaw drops plan to buy old Springs Mill site

    KERSHAW – There won’t be any buyer’s remorse by Kershaw Town Council when it comes to purchasing the old Springs Mills property bordered by Hampton and Matson streets.
    That’s because it’s backing out of the proposed purchase.
    After meeting behind closed doors for a briefing at its Monday, Oct. 19, meeting, council came into open section and voted unanimously not to pursue buying the 9.1-acre tract on the north side of the town limits.

  • City opts for early payoff

    Members of Lancaster City Council approved first reading of a measure at their Oct. 13 meeting, to double up on two debts to build up cash reserves for another pressing issue that must be dealt with.
    Without a single word, council unanimously voted to spend $330,000 to pay off loans early that funded 2010 improvements to the solid waste transfer station and its share of construction costs of the University of South Carolina Lancaster Native American Studies Center (NASC) on South Main Street.

  • Council interested in DLB expansion talks

    Lancaster County leaders have given an official nod to establishing talks with York County representatives about the possibility of connecting the two areas via an extension of Dave Lyle Boulevard.
    During its Oct. 12 meeting, Lancaster County Council unanimously approved a resolution authorizing Council Chairman Bob Bundy to consult with York County Council Chairman Britt Blackwell regarding a possible partnership on the long-discussed road project.

  • Heath Springs to split court cost with Kershaw

    HEATH SPRINGS – The towns of Heath Springs and Kershaw are following the city of Lancaster’s lead on addressing a state directive, but will join forces to do so.
    Recent legislation passed by the S.C. General Assembly now requires the state’s towns and cities to foot the bill for defendants who can’t pay for their own defense in municipal courts.

  • Mayor’s refusal to sign checks leads to policy change

    A rift between Lancaster City Council members surrounding the mayor’s refusal to sign two checks earlier this year will result in a procedural change.
    Following an at times contentious debate and a confusing unanimous vote, city council moved forward on a modified resolution that authorizes a second councilmember to sign checks in emergency situations.
    Council rejected a resolution that would authorize two additional councilmembers to sign checks.

  • How much did county spend on LCEDC legal issues?

    From crafting new bylaws to investigating Lancaster County’s failed bid to join the I-77 Alliance, county officials have funded a plethora of legal fees related to the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. during the last few years.
    But how much did it cost taxpayers?
    That’s the question several officials responded to this week as repercussions continue to be felt from Lancaster County Council’s Aug. 10 decision to rescind funding for, and end its years-long relationship with, LCEDC.

  • Residency requirement stalls at council meeting

    Does it matter if a county department head doesn’t live in Lancaster County?
    It’s an issue that has popped up on Lancaster County Council’s radar for years, though one councilwoman felt it was time to address the issue once and for all.
    During council’s Monday, Oct. 12 meeting, Councilwoman Charlene McGriff asked council to consider instituting a residency requirement for all newly hired county department heads.
    McGriff said she believed managers should “live where you represent.”