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Government

  • Baccalaureate services signal high school graduations

    Part of what makes graduation so memorable is the depth of tradition inherent in it.

    In the coming weeks, Lancaster County’s high school seniors will begin their march toward graduation with a ceremony that dates back to the days of the world’s ancient universities – baccalaureate.

    According to several sources, the services are believed to have begun at the United Kingdom’s University of Oxford sometime around 1432 to celebrate young lives dedicated to learning and wisdom.

  • Council gives nod to 4-H funding

    After a report on the contributions of the local 4-H, and an outpouring of support from the community, Lancaster County Council decided to fund the county’s 4-H agent position on Monday night, April 23. 

    The unanimous vote to approve funding the position, which provides a 4-H agent through the Clemson University Extension Service, came three weeks after council members discussed whether to renew a $35,000 contract for the agent. 

  • Public safety is top concern

    Public safety surpassed economic development on this year’s county strategic plan, as Lancaster County Council recently ranked the most important issues facing residents and the county. 

    With ongoing efforts by county officials to strengthen the local E-911 system and increase the number of law enforcement officers on patrol, council unanimously decided on making public safety its top goal. 

    “Public safety, that was just No. 1 for everyone,” said County Administrator Steve Willis. 

  • City council talk road repair

     

    At its Tuesday, April 10, meeting, Lancaster City Council discussed recommendations for road repaving that were made during its recent planning session.

    Each member listed two roads he or she would like to see would like to see selected by the County Transportation (CTC) for improvements.

    Each year the city suggests roads to the CTC) for resurfacing. The CTC then choses which ones will receive their repairs, which are paid for through funds from the CTC and S.C. Department of Transportation.

  • City to permit beer sales at Red Rose Festival

    This year’s Red Rose Festival will feature something extra for adults.

    Lancaster City Council voted 6-1 at its Tuesday, April 10, meeting to approve a resolution that permits the sale and consumption of beer at the upcoming festival on May 18 and 19.

    Councilwoman Linda Blackmon-Brace cast the dissenting vote.

    In November 2011, council revised an existing ordinance, to allow beer and wine to be sold at city-sponsored functions. However, a vendor must apply and be approved for each event.

  • City delays pole shed construction

    Money has been redirected in a way that may improve operations at the city of Lancaster’s building on 15th Street.

    Jerry Crockett, the city’s public works director, requested a funding change at City Council’s Tuesday, April 10, meeting.

    As part of the city’s capital-improvement plan (CIP), $30,000 had been set aside this budget year for the construction of a pole shed. Crockett said he’s realized it will take another $35,000 to complete the project.

  • Council considers community needs list

    Highway improvements, neighborhood revitalization and upgraded EMS and fire stations remain some of the top priorities for county officials.

    Those were just some of the many projects mentioned during a needs assessment public hearing at Lancaster County Council’s April 2 meeting.

    Held annually, the hearing is used to gather information and compile a community-needs list for Lancaster County, with help from the Catawba Regional Council of Governments. 

  • Council wants more info before funding 4-H agent position

    The fate of a local 4-H position hangs in the balance as Lancaster County Council considers whether to continue its funding. 

    That funding – $35,000 – provides a 4-H agent through the Clemson University Extension Service. It has been funded for decades, though council members discussed the feasibility of renewing the contract at its April 2 meeting. 

  • Filing wraps up for June primaries

    A woman familiar with congressional politics will challenge U.S. House Rep. Mick Mulvaney for the District 5 seat – one of several races office seekers filed for over the past few weeks.

    Joyce Knott, a Rock Hill businesswoman who once worked on the campaign staff for former U.S. Rep. John Spratt, has filed to run as a Democrat for that same seat in the June primary.

    That will presumably pit her against Mulvaney, the incumbent Republican, in November’s general election. 

  • Airport business park moves forward

    The approval of a new resolution by Lancaster County Council this week has kick-started progress on a new Lancaster Airport Business Park project.

    Following council’s closed session Monday, April 2, council members voted unanimously to approve Resolution 775, allowing for the purchase of several acres of land near the county’s airport. The resolution also begins the county’s due diligence process for eventually buying 100 more acres of land.