• Council agitated, confused by Estridge’s many motions

    Lancaster County Council deferred action on a pair of motions related to Indian Land’s Avondale development Monday night, as discussion of the matter devolved into a testy scrap over Robert’s Rules of Order.
    Located between Calvin Hall and Harrisburg roads, the 189-acre mixed-use Avondale development is to have more than 500 homes and 200 residences for seniors, plus limited commercial and retail space.

  • District 1 runoff goes to Graham

    Terry Graham of Van Wyck won the Lancaster County Council District 1 primary runoff election Tuesday against fellow Republican contender Melvin Stroble.
    Barring the slim possibility of a successful write-in campaign by another candidate, Tuesday night’s victory means Graham is the presumptive winner of the District 1 seat, since he has no Democratic challenger in the general election, which is Nov. 8.
    According to the Lancaster County Elections Office, Graham received 860 votes, or 60.52 percent of the 1,421 ballots cast in District 1.

  • Hunter Wallace wins auditor job

    Susan Hunter Wallace squeaked by in Tuesday’s runoff election for Lancaster County auditor, narrowly defeating Allen Blackmon.
    Hunter Wallace received 1,848 votes (51.3 percent) in the Republican runoff, leaving Blackmon close behind with 1,755 votes (48.7 percent). She will have no Democratic opposition in November’s general election.
    “I’m humbled, and I know I’m privileged to be the next auditor,” Hunter Wallace said. “It’s not money and it’s not power. I give (God) all the glory for this win.”

  • Primary runoff Tuesday

    All registered Lancaster County voters may vote in the Republican primary runoffs Tuesday.

    The June 28 runoffs, like the June 14 primaries, will be open elections to determine the GOP winners of the Lancaster County Council District 1 seat and county auditor’s post. 

  • Heath Springs Council passes budget, will not close RR crossings

    HEATH SPRINGS – Heath Springs Town Council unanimously approved the final reading of the town’s $361,158 budget for the 2016-17 fiscal year Tuesday night.
    The final budget doesn’t include any increase in the town’s water, sewer or garbage rates, but it does include a $2,000 increase for training and workshops.

  • Lancaster welcomes new city council member

    Hazel Taylor was sworn in Wednesday night as the new Lancaster City Council representative for District 5. She  was elected June 14 to fill the unexpired city council  term vacated by Mayor John Howard.

  • Kershaw: New budget includes property tax rollback

    KERSHAW – Kershaw Town Council unanimously passed first reading of the proposed $3.8 million 2016-17 budget Monday night, though its numbers are not yet finalized.
    Mitch Lucas, the town’s interim administrator, said he is still waiting on the final county numbers on how much the town will get in property tax revenue for 2016-17.

  • County council votes for hospitality tax

    Lancaster County Council took the first step Monday night toward approving a 2 percent  hospitality tax. The first reading of the ordinance passed 5-2.
    The tax would apply to all establishments that sell prepared meals and beverages located in the unincorporated areas of Lancaster County.
    “Estimated revenue from the hospitality tax could be as high as $800,000 per year,” said County Administrator Steve Willis.  

  • Holt, Freeman reinstated after much finger-wagging

    Facing an agitated crowd from the Panhandle, Lancaster County Council on Monday night reinstated two Indian Land members of the county planning commission who had been removed for missing too many meetings.
    Jerry Holt and David Freeman both missed five meetings this fiscal year, which automatically vacated their seats under county ordinance.
    Before voting, council members warned the two that if they wanted to be on the commission, they had to show up.

  • In reversal, 4-3 vote puts Avondale back on track

    Lancaster County Council reversed course on the Avondale development Monday night, voting to more forward with the project despite pleas from an overflowing chamber of red-shirted Indian Land residents.
    But the council also is placing the proposed Ansley Park project back on the agenda for its June 27 meeting, to address neighbors’ concerns about a change in the plan that they fear will worsen traffic.
    The Avondale ordinance will return to council for a second reading June 27. A public hearing will be held before the third and final reading.