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Government

  • 5th District Candidate: David Kulma

    Party: Green.
    Age: 32.
    Residence: Rock Hill.
    Family: Wife, Kristen. Dog, Pollock.
    Education: Graduated from high school in 2003. Received a bachelor’s degree in oboe performance and a master’s in music composition from Kent State University.
    Employment: Adjunct professor of music, Winthrop University.
    Civic involvement: None listed.
    Political experience: None.
    Top issues:

  • 5th District Candidate: Victor Kocher

    Party: Libertarian.
    Age: 54.
    Residence: Columbia.
    Family: Divorced, no children.
    Education: Graduated from high school in 1980.
    Received bachelor’s degree in business administration from West Virginia University  in 1984 and a master’s in accounting there in 1986.
    Employment: Semi-retired, self-employed.
    Civic involvement: Involved in church and local community groups.

  • Opponents take shots at Norman

    Kali Coleman
    kcoleman@thelancasternews.com

    Congressional hopefuls Archie Parnell, Josh Thornton and David Kulma debated key issues Friday night – and targeted absent GOP candidate Ralph Norman – at a Rock Hill candidate forum hosted by the state NAACP.
    Noticeably absent from the American Values Forum was Norman, who was listed on the original press releases for the event but later canceled his appearance, citing a scheduling conflict.

  • Lawmakers pass $8B state budget Tuesday

    Members of Lancaster County’s legislative delegation were in Columbia on Tuesday for a special called session of the General Assembly to approve next year’s state budget.
    During the session, lawmakers considered an $8 billion general fund budget worked out last week by the six-member Conference Committee noted for funding increases for schools, including the University of South Carolina Lancaster, and the state’s pension fund.

  • Gilbert focused on replacing Duracell

    The city of Lancaster’s biggest recruiting tool in its quest to replace the departing Duracell operation, Jamie Gilbert says, is the quality of Duracell’s workforce.
    “We’ve been out there several times in the last couple of months,” said Gilbert, Lancaster County’s economic development director. “What you see is a workforce that is as committed and dedicated to get the job done as they were prior to the announcement they were closing.

  • Kershaw eyes expense hikes, but fixing leak to yield savings

    KERSHAW – Town officials hope that finding and fixing a gigantic water leak will save Kershaw enough money to offset several unavoidable expense increases in the proposed $3.9 million budget for 2017-18.
    The budget, which passed first reading May 15, does not include a property tax increase at this point, though that might change before second reading. The town is awaiting information on how much it will get through the local-option sales tax.
    “It’s going to be tight again. It always is,” said Mayor Mark Dorman.

  • City budget plan ups fees, lowers taxes, cuts 11 jobs

    Lancaster City Council members got their first look at next fiscal year’s proposed budget Tuesday night, which lowers property taxes slightly for city residents but increases fees on city services for some.
    The budget also positions the city against a loss of revenue from Duracell’s departure next year by banking a portion of the city’s potential millage increase, withholding cost of living raises for city employees and cutting nearly a dozen jobs.

  • Heath Springs: Cost of deputy rising too fast, will do without

    HEATH SPRINGS – Citing a 64 percent increase in cost, the town of Heath Springs will not renew its agreement with the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office that supplies a deputy to the town for 40 hours a week.
    To renew, the cost of the contract would have soared from $23,500 per year to $38,500 per year. The current contract expires June 30.
    And for a small town with no property tax whose revenue comes from mostly water and sewer rates, the additional $15,000 cost was too much to absorb, said Mark Bridges, the town’s major pro tem.

  • Council votes for $81M budget

    The Lancaster County Council unanimously passed its first reading of the new $81.1 million budget Monday night with a few minor tweaks reflecting a commitment to public works and public safety.
    The fiscal 2017-18 budget is $2.1 million more than this year’s, and property owners would see a slight rise in taxes.
    Homeowners with a home valued at $100,000 and vehicles worth $30,000 would see property taxes rise $22.26, to a total of $485.42. Breaking that down, it’s $15 more on the home and $7.26 on the vehicles.  

  • Proposed county budget contains tax hike, pay raises, 20 new jobs

    The Lancaster County Council will review the proposed 2017-18 budget at its meeting Monday night.
    The new budget includes a slightly higher property tax rate, a 2 percent salary increase for county workers and more money for cyber-security. It addresses public works and public safety in an effort to keep up with the county’s growing population, which is nearing 90,000 people.