• Why did the tide turn against the LCEDC?

    You inch past a serious wreck on the interstate. Cars and an 18-wheeler sit mangled and steaming. Medics scramble to help the wounded. People are yelling, some are crying.
    The troubling scene recedes in your rearview mirror as you rev back up to highway speed and wonder what happened. Was it a texting driver? Blown tire? Road rage? You’ll probably never know.
    The aftermath of the August collision between Lancaster County officials and the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. has been similarly messy, troubling and hard to understand.

  • Dorman wins Kershaw mayor’s race

    KERSHAW – A former town council member is headed back to town hall as Kershaw mayor.
    Mark Dorman defeated Morris Russell, Sonya Poole and Johnny Carter on Tuesday, Nov. 3, to win the first-ever write-in campaign in Lancaster County history.
    After the vote was certified by the Lancaster County Election Commission on Thursday, Nov. 5, Dorman had 161 total votes to Russell’s 131 votes.
    Poole, an at-large member of town council, had 24 votes. Carter, another former town councilman, had 21 total votes.

  • Heath Springs, Kershaw council elections Tuesday

    KERSHAW – A precedent will be made Tuesday, Nov. 3, when Kershaw voters select a new mayor through a write-in vote.
    No political candidate in Lancaster County history has ever been successfully elected through the write-in process.
    “It’s never happened,” said local historian Lindsay Pettus.
    Four candidates – Johnny Carter, Mark Dorman, Sonya Poole and Morris Russell – have launched write-in campaigns for Kershaw mayor.

  • City tables vote on $25k LCEDC dues

    Lancaster County isn’t the only entity to tighten the purse strings of the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. (LCEDC).
     The city of Lancaster hasn’t paid its $25,000 membership/participation dues for fiscal year 2015-16 to the corporation, though the organization is seeking its continued support.
    At it’s Tuesday, Oct. 27 meeting, city council tabled a vote on the city’s LCEDC dues until it gets more information.  

  • Council holds pat on landscaping requests

    HEATH SPRINGS – After discussing three landscaping matters in executive session during a special meeting on Monday, Oct. 26, members of Heath Springs Town Council took action on two of them.
    Council voted unanimously not to sow winter rye grass on public property and not to pay landscaper Darren Sowell an additional $1,472 for 184 bales of pine straw he placed in the town early this year.

  • Council to discuss unbuilt condos, townhouses with Pulte

    Should the county be compensated for lost tax revenue from several agreed upon, but still unbuilt, condominiums and townhouses inside Indian Land’s massive Sun City Carolina Lakes neighborhood?
    That question was at the heart of a debate among Lancaster County Council members on Monday, Oct. 26, as they discussed how to proceed with the neighborhood’s developer, Georgia-based Pulte Group.  

  • LCEDC board member upset audit not on council agenda

    Though he only had three minutes to speak to Lancaster County Council during its meeting Monday night, Oct. 26, John Baker made the most of every second.
    As the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp.’s board vice-chairman, Baker was upset his organization’s latest audit wasn’t included on council’s agenda for discussion. And without a designated time to present the audit in full, Baker decided to claim his allotted three minutes of speaking time during the citizen comments portion of the meeting.

  • Kershaw drops plan to buy old Springs Mill site

    KERSHAW – There won’t be any buyer’s remorse by Kershaw Town Council when it comes to purchasing the old Springs Mills property bordered by Hampton and Matson streets.
    That’s because it’s backing out of the proposed purchase.
    After meeting behind closed doors for a briefing at its Monday, Oct. 19, meeting, council came into open section and voted unanimously not to pursue buying the 9.1-acre tract on the north side of the town limits.

  • City opts for early payoff

    Members of Lancaster City Council approved first reading of a measure at their Oct. 13 meeting, to double up on two debts to build up cash reserves for another pressing issue that must be dealt with.
    Without a single word, council unanimously voted to spend $330,000 to pay off loans early that funded 2010 improvements to the solid waste transfer station and its share of construction costs of the University of South Carolina Lancaster Native American Studies Center (NASC) on South Main Street.

  • Council interested in DLB expansion talks

    Lancaster County leaders have given an official nod to establishing talks with York County representatives about the possibility of connecting the two areas via an extension of Dave Lyle Boulevard.
    During its Oct. 12 meeting, Lancaster County Council unanimously approved a resolution authorizing Council Chairman Bob Bundy to consult with York County Council Chairman Britt Blackwell regarding a possible partnership on the long-discussed road project.