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Government

  • Kershaw officials expect $142K in purchases, requiring tax hike

    KERSHAW – Kershaw residents should brace for a tax increase in the next fiscal year.
    The town council passed first reading of an ordinance Tuesday night to fund up to $142,000 in equipment and capital-improvement purchases with general obligation bonds, which must be repaid through property tax revenue.
    Exactly how much Kershaw taxes could go up is unknown, said Mayor Mark Dorman, but the town needs to watch every dollar it spends.
    “I want to be as conservative as I can to make sure we get what we need, not what we want,” he said.

  • City finance chief Driggers resigns

    After just nine months on the job, Lancaster Finance Director Daniel Driggers has resigned effective May 11.
    “It is with a heavy heart that I offer my resignation…. I appreciate the opportunity that was given to me,” Driggers said in a Thursday interview. “Council has been really supportive of me, and everyone has made me feel welcome here.
    “It’s been a pleasure. I hope that I’ve helped the city during my time here,” he said.

  • Tameka Morrow, the sole filer, gets Heath Springs council seat

    HEATH SPRINGS – Lone candidate Tameka Morrow won Tuesday’s special election in Heath Springs to fill the at-large town council seat vacated in January when Eddie Moore was sworn in as mayor.
    Just 37 votes were cast, with Morrow getting 35 of them. She will be sworn in before the May 15 town council meeting.

  • Garris: We must listen to citizens, take action

    Tamara Green Garris is fiercely proud of her hometown, and says she’s running for mayor to continue moving it forward.
    “I’m native born in Lancaster – raised and reared,” the 44-year-old mayor pro tem said Thursday. “I grew up in the district I represent.
    “I won’t be the kind of mayor that will only show up on Tuesday or at budget meetings,” she said. “I will go out and touch citizens by working with them and listening to them.”

  • Garris: We must listen to citizens, take action

    Tamara Green Garris is fiercely proud of her hometown, and says she’s running for mayor to continue moving it forward.
    “I’m native born in Lancaster – raised and reared,” the 44-year-old mayor pro tem said Thursday. “I grew up in the district I represent.
    “I won’t be the kind of mayor that will only show up on Tuesday or at budget meetings,” she said. “I will go out and touch citizens by working with them and listening to them.”

  • Eddins: Put infrastructure at No. 1 on city agenda

    City council member Sara Eddins wants to be mayor to continue the legacy of her friend John Howard.
    When Mayor Howard passed away this month, the 79-year-old retired teacher knew she had to take action.
    “When we lost John [Howard] is when I decided to run,” Eddins said Thursday. “We we’re very close. I taught high in high school. He always called me Dear Lady. I would like to take his place.”

  • What’s next for Van Wyck?

    With the rejection of the proposed Indian Land incorporation, the pressure on the town of Van Wyck to aggressively annex has finally subsided.
    But local officials say there is no plan for the town to stop its continuing annexation push.
    “It definitely has relieved the pressure,” said Town Administrator Linda Vaughan. “But we still have people interested in annexing, and as long as we have anyone to petition to annex, we’ll do that.”
    Councilman Xavier Kee agrees.

  • Parnell’s list: Gun control, health-care, tax changes

    Congressional candidate Archie Parnell campaigned in Lancaster on Thursday, saying it’s time to take a serious look at restricting sales of military-style semiautomatic weapons.
    Since the federal assault-weapons ban was lifted in 2004, he asserted, gun deaths from military-style rifles have more than tripled.
    “That’s something that we as a rational country just can’t live with,” Parnell said while also discussing healthcare and taxes during a packed meeting of the Lancaster County Democratic Party.

  • Special mayoral election set for July 10

    As Lancaster mourns John Howard’s passing, city officials must put in motion the process for filling the mayoral seat he left behind.
    The seat was already up for re-election Nov. 6, but City Administrator Flip Hutfles said state law doesn’t allow the city to wait until that election.
    “When a vacancy occurs in the mayor’s office more than 180 days from its election, then a special election must be held,” Hutfles said.

  • County weighs $10.8M bond issue to finance recreation needs

    County officials might put a $10.8 million bond referendum before voters in November to fund recreation upgrades across the county.
    Officials are in the initial stages of a plan that would get the measure on the general election ballot Nov. 13.
    If approved, the bond would be used for five projects:
    ◆ Upgrade and expand the Indian Land Recreation Center on U.S. 521, at a cost of $4.5 million.
    ◆ Develop the planned Harrisburg Road Soccer Complex for $2.5 million.  
    ◆ Partly fund the Lindsay Pettus Greenway with $2.5 million.