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Government

  • Rick Quinn Jr. pleads guilty in State House corruption case

    Former House Majority Leader Rick Quinn Jr. pleaded guilty to official corruption Tuesday, after resigning from the S.C. House an hour before the hearing.
    The Lexington Republican pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count of misconduct in office.
    First Circuit Solicitor and Special Prosecutor David Pascoe asked for the maximum sentence allowed, one year in prison, arguing that Quinn committed the worst crimes uncovered so far in the ongoing legislative corruption investigation.

  • Blackmon: Scrap late fees on water bills

    City council held a special called meeting Wednesday night and spent about 40 minutes debating a $25 fee that the utilities department charges customers who are late paying their water bills.
    Council member Linda Blackmon brought up the matter, saying she favored dropping the fee entirely.

  • Kershaw: County should take Stevens Park

    In a money-saving move, the town of Kershaw is asking the county to take over ownership and most of the operating costs of Stevens Park. 
    Kershaw Town Council voted 6-0 Monday night, with councilman Eddie Coates absent, for a “memorandum of understanding” outling the town’s proposal.

  • City denies church’s request to waive debt

    Lancaster City Council voted 5-2 Tuesday night to deny Victory Tabernacle AME Zion Church’s request to have $1,100 in land-clearing fees forgiven.
    Council members Gonzie Mackey, Kenny Hood, Linda Blackmon, Mayor Pro Tem Tamara Green Garris and Mayor John Howard voted against the motion, and council members Hazel Taylor and Sara Eddins voted for it.
    The church was denied the waiver because the city had already granted the church a waiver previously. The city has a one-time waiver policy.

  • Why isn’t IL town vote moving ahead?

    Two months after approval of their plan by a key legislative committee in Columbia, the leaders of Indian land’s incorporation effort have yet to take the next step toward a public vote on the issue.
    County election officials say Panhandle residents are expressing concern about when, how and where the voting will take place, and who will be responsible for assuring its accuracy.

  • Van Wyck council gets down to business

    VAN WYCK – Less than two weeks after the town’s first-ever election, Van Wyck’s mayor and council aren’t wasting time.
    They’re already moving ahead with plans to grow town boundaries through annexation.
    Van Wyck Mayor Sean Corcoran said 16 property owners turned in annexation petitions during a Nov. 18 swearing-in ceremony and barbecue at Van Wyck Presbyterian Church, while several others expressed interest.

  • Mulvaney steps into political storm

    WASHINGTON – A federal judge ruled late Tuesday that Mick Mulvaney can keep juggling two executive branch agencies at the president’s behest, keeping him at the center of a partisan battle over consumer protection.
    Mulvaney, the White House budget director and a former U.S. House member from Indian Land, showed up for his second job Monday morning as acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. He carried at big bag of Dunkin’ Donuts.

  • Kershaw gets $100K grant to chart path

    Gregory A. Summers
    gsummers@thelancasternews.com
    KERSHAW – Kershaw officials want dialogue and new ideas to shape the town’s vision, and they’re about to get an earful thanks to a $100,000 grant awarded this week.
    The town received the Community Heart & Soul grant from the Vermont-based Orton Family Foundation and its local partner, the J. Marion Sims Foundation.

  • City council OKs switch to digital communication

    The Lancaster City Council has approved an upgrade to the city’s dispatch system.
    Council unanimously voted for the agenda item 5-0, with council members Tamara Green Garris and Linda Blackmon absent from the Nov. 14 meeting. The upgrade will cost the city $22,330.
    “It’s one of those things that – it’s not that we want to do it…, we’ve got to do it,” said Mayor John Howard.

  • Cyber-attack scenario

    A mock cyber-attack against the U.S. power grid kept 57 people from 13 Lancaster County agencies hopping for several tense hours Wenesday, reacting to the catastrophic scenario.
    The drill, called GridEx IV, was designed to test local responses to the loss of the electrical system for an extended period of time. More than 5,000 government, business and nonprofit stakeholders nationwide participated in the training.