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Government

  • It’s official: Mitch Lucas gets the job

    KERSHAW – Kershaw Town Council unanimously named Mitch Lucas town administrator this week, six months after he stepped into the job on an interim basis when the previous administrator left in a rush.
    This continues Lucas’ long-running service to Kershaw. He was a town council member from 1987-97 and mayor from April 1999 to June 2000. He retired in 2008 as the human resources director for the Lancaster County School District.

  • Council to hear IL developer’s appeal

    An Indian Land apartment development twice rejected by the Lancaster County Planning Commission will take its case directly to county council members Monday night, asking them to overrule the planning board.
    The council will hear an appeal from Two Capital, which wants to build 313 apartments at the intersection of S.C. 160 and Calvin Hall Road.
    The planning commission denied Two Capital’s plan because of traffic and architectural design issues, both in violation of the Unified Development Ordinance, according to Jerry Holt, the commission’s vice chair.

  • Mulvaney gets lift from Scott

    U.S. Rep. Mick Mulvaney campaigned with U.S. Sen. Tim Scott over the weekend, telling about 100 supporters at an Indian Land fundraiser that his opponent, Fran Person, is an unknown quantity to most Fifth District voters.
    “The guy has raised almost a million dollars. Nobody knows who he is, not even any Democrats around here know who he is, but he’s sitting on a giant stash of money,” said Mulvaney, a three-term Republican. “We expect to see all of that money dumped into negative ad campaigns in the last 30 days.”

  • City services at the touch of a smartphone app

    Need to pay your Lancaster utility bill, report a mammoth pothole, apply for a city job or scope out festival details?
    There’s now an app for that.
    City IT director Jarvis Driggers presented the Red Rose City’s new mobile app at Tuesday’s city council meeting.
    “This is a living and breathing app,” Driggers said. “This app’s going to change. It’s going to change daily, weekly and monthly, and it’s going to change to the events and what’s going on in the city at the time.”

  • Council puts Avondale on agenda for Sept. 26

    The Lancaster County Council voted Monday night to place the on-again, off-again Avondale development ordinance back on the agenda for its Sept. 26 meeting.
    Support is coming from those who previously opposed the 189-acre mixed-use development, located between Calvin Hall and Harrisburg roads.
    The flip-flop of support comes from frustrated residents in Indian Land who see the development’s offer as their only chance for road and traffic improvements.

  • Kershaw holding hearing on oak trees

    The town of Kershaw will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Thursday about the town council’s decision last month to cut down four 100-year-old oak trees at the intersection of North Matson and East Marion streets.
    Kershaw mayor Mark Dorman called the trees a sticky subject.
    “This is something town officials clearly see both sides of,” Dorman said. “We’re supposed to represent all our citizens, which is why we need their input before going forward.”

  • Rep. Norrell appointed to tax-reform committee

    COLUMBIA – Rep. Mandy Powers Norrell of Lancaster is among 14 S.C. House members on a special tax-reform committee appointed Tuesday by House Speaker Jay Lucas.
    Norrell, a Democrat whose 44th District includes Lancaster, Heath Springs and Kershaw, will serve on the bipartisan panel, which will review the S.C. tax code and make recommendations to Lucas for changes before the next legislative session.

  • Elgin residents’ concerns stall UDO rewrite by several weeks

    Public concerns over the county’s new Unified Development Ordinance and Official Zoning Map has resulted in at least another month being added to the already 19-month-long rewriting process for the UDO.
    More than 75 people, most from the Elgin community, attended the UDO public hearing Tuesday night to voice their concerns about the ordinance’s Environmental Hazardous Overlay District, which they fear will restrict their land use. Many addressed the Planning Commission during the citizens’ comments portion in the four-hour meeting.

  • City council rejects police raises

    A two-month-long effort by the Lancaster Police Department to get pay raises for nine mid-level and senior officers has been rejected by Lancaster City Council.
    City employees from other departments turned out in force at Tuesday night’s council meeting, arguing that if the officers got raises, all other city workers should get raises too. After a long executive session to discuss the matter, council voted 5-2 against the police pay hikes.

  • Council votes for Red Ventures tax incentive

    Lancaster County Council approved second reading of a tax-incentive package for internet marketing firm Red Ventures and an affiliated real estate company that would save the businesses an estimated $25.6 million in taxes over 30 years.
    The incentive matter, one of several on the agenda for local companies, prompted discussion of a longstanding, yet rarely collected county tax on properties once zoned agricultural.