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Education

  • A field trip for Fields

    Crystal Fields’ recent trip to Washington, D.C., was more eventful than she thought it would be.

    Fields, the lead ESOL (English as a Second or Other Language) teacher for Lancaster County School District, visited the nation’s capital for two reasons June 22 through June 27.

  • Teaching through the arts

    Discussion of drawings, paintings and poetry isn’t being restricted to just art classes.

    Melanie Rick Layne wants educators to know that the arts can be used in all disciplines to help students learn and achieve at a higher level.

    Layne, who works with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, facilitated a seminar last week for teachers in the Lancaster County School District and Rock Hill schools.  

  • A heartbeat, a pulse

    KERSHAW – Blood pressure and heart rates are just some of the vital signs students at York Technical College’s Kershaw/Heath Springs Center will be able to read in class.

    Nursing students and others taking classes under York Tech’s medical programs will soon have access to two patient simulators.

    The full-body manikins have a temperature, pulse and heart beat – signs students can monitor on a screen display as they would real-life patients.

  • A Google of a doodle

    Hayden Lee shared his love for music through a recent drawing contest sponsored by Google, the popular Internet search engine.

    Lee, a rising seventh-grader at Andrew Jackson Middle School, was a state finalist in this year’s Doodle 4 Google contest, which was open to kindergarten through 12th grade students across the United States.

    The contest allows a student to put his or her own personal and artistic touch on the Google word logo. Student entries had to be submitted by late March and judging took place in May.

  • Johnesha Graham isn’t going to let a tuition increase get in the way of her degree.

    Graham, 28, is just one of many students who will be paying higher tuition payments at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster this fall. The university recently announced a 6.5 percent increase in its tuition costs for the upcoming school year. Fees, including technology, science lab, matriculation and parking fees, have also increased.

  • Heath Springs children attend summer camp

    HEATH SPRINGS – There was a different activity going on in each corner of the Heath Springs Community Center on Thursday.

    In one area, a group of children worked on math equations. And nearby, another group played the board game Scrabble.

    Everywhere you looked, youngsters were either working on projects, playing games or receiving help with academics – and all appeared to be having fun in the process.  

  • Learning and having fun

    A collection of Silly Bandz was the hot topic among a group of youngsters at the Hi-Kee summer camp Wednesday.

    Although those participants were excited about the popular rubber bands, you’d soon see that was just one of several things discussed during the day. Enrichment exercises took up a big part of their time.

    The Hi-Kee camp, held at Steele Hill AME Zion Church on Charlotte Highway, began June 7 and runs through July.

  • Standing tall with determination

    Tyrone “Muggsy” Bogues was told his entire life that he was too short to play basketball.

    Some people believed he was placed on teams out of pity or to draw large crowds for amusement. Not many people thought he could make a career out of the sport.

    Bogues, standing at 5 feet, 3 inches, proved a lot of people wrong through the years and now shares his story of will and determination with others.

  • Preparing for kindergarten

    Local educators are gearing up for the annual program that helps make a child’s first year of public school a little more comfortable for all involved.

    Countdown to K, the state’s school transition program for rising kindergartners, kicks off this month and runs into August. Eleven kindergarten teachers in Lancaster County are participating this year.

  • USCL students inducted into national leadership society

    Career-building resources, networking and leadership training are just some of the advantages of membership in the National Society of Leadership and Success.

    The organization – also known as Sigma Alpha Pi – has members all across the nation.

    Fifteen USCL students were inducted Thursday into the school’s chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success.

    The ceremony was held at the Carole Ray Dowling Center.