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Education

  • 60 outstanding students receive principals’ awards

    Clinton Elementary fourth-grader Yo’Zarius Stewart proved to a big crowd Thursday night exactly why he was one of 60 students to receive a Principals’ Choice award.
    Yo’Zarius, 10, was nonverbal and shy at the start of the school year. Thursday night he stood on stage proudly and read a book to the crowd of nearly 400 in USC Lancaster’s Bundy Auditorium.

  • Phillip Mickles placed on leave after discipline incident at school

    Phillip Mickles, a teacher at Barr Street Learning Center, was placed on administrative leave Tuesday after an allegation that he improperly disciplined a student at the school.
    According to a Lancaster Police Department report, Mickles and a student got into a “physical disturbance” Tuesday morning. Mickles advised the student to stop “leaning back in his chair,” which the student continued to do, the report said.

  • ‘Potential finalists’ spend 6 hours with school board

    During a nearly six-hour meeting Wednesday, mainly spent in executive session, the Lancaster County school board interviewed three “potential finalists” for the next superintendent.
    The board met with the three candidates, who were chosen from the nearly 20 applicants, Wednesday afternoon and into the evening.
    “We had some good interviews,” said Bobby Parker, chairman of the board. “I think we are well on our way to our final three.”

  • Educator Noblitt dies at 80

    Martha “Mot” Noblitt, who spent more than three decades as a teacher, coach and administrator in the Lancaster County School District, died Thursday. She was 80.
    Noblitt was born and raised in Shelby, N.C., She began her career at Lancaster High School in the mid-’60s as a physical education and science teacher and coached girl’s basketball. She became an LHS assistant principal and later principal of McDonald Green Elementary.

  • 1 teacher charged, another resigns after cases of improper discipline

    Two Lancaster County School District teachers were placed on administrative leave, with one resigning, after separate incidents of improper discipline.
    Bruce James Snipes, 32, was suspended with pay from Brooklyn Springs Elementary after he was accused of pushing a 10-year-old male student to the ground March 8.

  • Schools will start early because of lunar eclipse

    The Lancaster County school board approved the 2017-18 academic calendar Tuesday, with an earlier start date due to the total solar eclipse law.
    The first day of school is Thursday, Aug. 17.
    State law normally requires districts to begin after the third Monday of August. Passed Feb. 28, the eclipse law is allowing an early start for the 2017-18 academic year. The purpose is to begin instruction earlier and provide an educational opportunity for students during a solar eclipse on Aug. 21.

  • A.R. Rucker academic challenge team wins state championship

    The last answer that won the 2017 state championship for A.R. Rucker Middle School’s academic challenge team was “herbivores.”
    Rucker’s team was named the Division II state champion for middle schools Thursday after a 32-22 victory over Lexington County’s Pine Ridge Middle School.
    The championship is the first for A.R. Rucker’s academic challenge team.
    Bringing in 17 points – the most points out of the five team members who competed – was eighth-grader Louie Prete.

  • 130 attend student-safety forum in Indian Land

    Lancaster County School District officials hosted the first of several After-School Student Safety Forums on Tuesday at Indian Land Middle School, drawing a crowd of nearly 130 parents and students.
    Panelists addressed the dangers of playing the “choking game,” vehicle and bus safety, social media, drugs, gun safety and bullying.

  • Annette Melton: No more field days in heels

    It’s time for Dr. Annette Melton’s next challenge.
    The Kershaw Elementary School principal will no longer be climbing ropes on field day in high heels. She is retiring after 34 years with the Lancaster County School District and seven years as KES principal. She will become state director for AdvancED, a educational nonprofit headquartered in Tempe, Ariz., and Alpharetta, Ga.
    Her last day was March 10.

  • Joe Keenan: ‘You know when it’s time to go’

    Joe Keenan was so excited when he became principal of Lancaster High School in July 1996, he forgot to pick up his wife, Debbie, from the hospital after surgery.
    His new job was just that enthralling.
    Now, 21 years later, Dr. Keenan has decided to retire.
    “People tell you ‘you know when it’s time to go,’ and it’s time,” he said.
    Keenan, 56, said some of his best memories are the school winning Palmetto Gold and Silver Awards for student achievement, and the Lady Bruins’ 2015 state basketball championship.