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Education

  • Lancaster High band to perform in Washington

    From release

    The Lancaster High School Band will perform in Washington, D.C., on May 6. 

    The Lancaster High band students were invited to represent South Carolina in the Salute to Veterans program taking place in various locations around the country during 2011. 

    The Lancaster band is scheduled to perform at the Iwo Jima Memorial. 

    Band director John Rhodes is proud of this opportunity. 

  • AJHS show choir rocks contest

    When it comes to choruses, they don’t get much hotter than Andrew Jackson High School’s show choir.

    Fresh off a state title, the choir came in first at WTVI’s annual “My School Rocks” fundraising program April 9 in Charlotte.

    In doing so, the choir not only proved its mettle against much larger schools – three from North Carolina and two from Rock Hill – but walked away with the “Most Rocking School in the Carolinas” title and a $5,000 check.

  • York Technical students work for a good grade, good cause

    Students from a York Technical College business class got hands on for a good cause Friday, March 18, by volunteering to help a local homeless shelter.

    Armed with nail guns, tape measures and a level, the students started their service learning project for Lancaster's Family Promise with a little carpentry work.

    By the time the project's over, the five students from the school's Executive Development class hope to not only earn a good grade and learn crucial leadership skills, but help a worthy cause in the process.

  • Teens told best 'high' hinges on good decisions

    Lancaster Coalition for Healthy Youth wrapped up its three-day conference on the Prevention of Youth Substance Abuse in Rural Communities on Wednesday night by taking the message straight to their target audience — teens.

    The guest speaker for Teen Night, one of four keynote speakers during the conference, was youth motivational speaker, stand-up comedian, author and clinical neuropsychologist Matt Bellace.

  • Substance abuse conference a success

    Officials with Lancaster County’s Coalition for Healthy Youth said this year’s fourth Prevention of Youth Substance Abuse in Rural Communities conference was another success.

    The three-day event, held March 7-10 at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s Bradley building, drew about 150 drug-prevention specialists, counselors, ministers, school personnel, nonprofit administrators and others from as far away as Washington state. 

    The conference was funded, in part, by a $20,000 city of Lancaster hospitality tax grant.

  • Bailey takes bite out of bee

    Meet Adam Bailey, 13, a seventh-grade student at A.R. Rucker Middle School in Lancaster.

    Easy going, with a wide, braces-filled smile, Bailey is tall for his age and slim, a runner on the Lancaster High School cross country team whose favorite class is math. 

    In his off-time, Baily is a Boy Scout in Troop 72, active in Second Baptist Youth, and like most teenagers, enjoys music. Favorite bands? The Strokes and, believe it or not, The Beatles.

    And, oh yeah, he’s also a great speller.

  • Channel your child’s inner artist

     Do you have a rising Renoir creating masterpieces at home? Potential Picasso? Mini Matisse? Budding young artists can participate in the Del Webb Library at Indian Land’s “Art Studio at the Library,” a month-long event in March allowing children the chance to create their own artwork.

  • Message of service

    University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s TRiO program honored Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Thursday with a celebration of his message of service to the community.
    The theme for  the event, attended by about 40 students and faculty members, was Plan+Serve=Impact.
    TRiO Career/Cultural Specialist Matt Williamson said the celebration was an attempt to connect younger students with the civil rights movement.

  • Taking care of the kids on snow days

    While much attention has been focused on school closures due to the snow and ice event that gripped Lancaster County last week, one group of people was affected even more than students – their parents.
    Faced with the loss of their daily de facto day care, many parents suddenly found themselves scrambling to make arrangements for what they were going to do with their children during the day while they were at work.
    For many, like the self-employed photographer Amy Sapp of Frankly, Daisy Photography, it was a tough week.

  • Art Attack Gift Shop

    Sometimes you find the most pleasing surprises in the most unexpected places.
    Take, for example, the Art Attack Gift Shop at Lancaster High School.
    Tucked between two art classes near the end of a hallway, the shop is located in a former storage room.
    Though small, the room is stuffed with an amazing range artwork.