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Education

  • Teens told best 'high' hinges on good decisions

    Lancaster Coalition for Healthy Youth wrapped up its three-day conference on the Prevention of Youth Substance Abuse in Rural Communities on Wednesday night by taking the message straight to their target audience — teens.

    The guest speaker for Teen Night, one of four keynote speakers during the conference, was youth motivational speaker, stand-up comedian, author and clinical neuropsychologist Matt Bellace.

  • Substance abuse conference a success

    Officials with Lancaster County’s Coalition for Healthy Youth said this year’s fourth Prevention of Youth Substance Abuse in Rural Communities conference was another success.

    The three-day event, held March 7-10 at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s Bradley building, drew about 150 drug-prevention specialists, counselors, ministers, school personnel, nonprofit administrators and others from as far away as Washington state. 

    The conference was funded, in part, by a $20,000 city of Lancaster hospitality tax grant.

  • Bailey takes bite out of bee

    Meet Adam Bailey, 13, a seventh-grade student at A.R. Rucker Middle School in Lancaster.

    Easy going, with a wide, braces-filled smile, Bailey is tall for his age and slim, a runner on the Lancaster High School cross country team whose favorite class is math. 

    In his off-time, Baily is a Boy Scout in Troop 72, active in Second Baptist Youth, and like most teenagers, enjoys music. Favorite bands? The Strokes and, believe it or not, The Beatles.

    And, oh yeah, he’s also a great speller.

  • Channel your child’s inner artist

     Do you have a rising Renoir creating masterpieces at home? Potential Picasso? Mini Matisse? Budding young artists can participate in the Del Webb Library at Indian Land’s “Art Studio at the Library,” a month-long event in March allowing children the chance to create their own artwork.

  • Message of service

    University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s TRiO program honored Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Thursday with a celebration of his message of service to the community.
    The theme for  the event, attended by about 40 students and faculty members, was Plan+Serve=Impact.
    TRiO Career/Cultural Specialist Matt Williamson said the celebration was an attempt to connect younger students with the civil rights movement.

  • Taking care of the kids on snow days

    While much attention has been focused on school closures due to the snow and ice event that gripped Lancaster County last week, one group of people was affected even more than students – their parents.
    Faced with the loss of their daily de facto day care, many parents suddenly found themselves scrambling to make arrangements for what they were going to do with their children during the day while they were at work.
    For many, like the self-employed photographer Amy Sapp of Frankly, Daisy Photography, it was a tough week.

  • Art Attack Gift Shop

    Sometimes you find the most pleasing surprises in the most unexpected places.
    Take, for example, the Art Attack Gift Shop at Lancaster High School.
    Tucked between two art classes near the end of a hallway, the shop is located in a former storage room.
    Though small, the room is stuffed with an amazing range artwork.

  • Local students speak out to win at event

    Lancaster District AME Zion Churches
    INDIAN LAND – Fifteen teens participated in the Lancaster District AMEZ Churches’ sixth annual Oratorical Exposé on Sept. 23.
    The purpose of the speaking contest was to emphasize youth development in speaking publicly and to do research to improve personal skills.

  • Poetry comes alive

    He’s faced with no running water, fortress-like walls and dark windows that block the sunshine.
    He’s a prisoner who feels all of life’s joys and opportunities have been stripped away, yet he manages to stay positive. Through adversity, he finds himself and even discovers subtle joys amidst the pain.
    This is the scenario in “Who Understands Me But Me,” a Jimmy Santiago Baca poem recited by a Lancaster County high school student at Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • Growth by exposure

    INDIAN LAND – When Indian Land High School Principal Kathy Faris went looking for a program to help take her school to the next level academically, she settled on a collective theme.
    Faris wanted an overarching theme that would tie together the school’s diverse curriculum across all disciplines and grade levels, and give students a deeper understanding of what they were learning.
    There was a whole world of ideas out there – and, ultimately, it was literally the world that the school settled on.