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Education

  • LHS student attends 4-H leadership conference

    Kelly Morrissette
    For The Lancaster News

    Jasmine Blair, a 16-year-old junior at Lancaster High School, attended the Pinckney 4-H Leadership Conference at Clemson University last month.
    It was a weeklong dose of fun and learning, from whitewater rafting to making shoes for Ugandans to cultivating leadership skills.

  • Bats creeping out kids, staff at Great Falls school

    Brian Garner
    Landmark News Service

    Chester County school officials are working to eliminate a problem with bats in the cafeteria and classroom areas at Great Falls Elementary School.
    School district Chief Operations Officer Jeff Gardner talked about the efforts at a recent meeting of the Facility Advisory Committee. The bats were a problem last school year, and the district tried to deal with the creepy creatures this summer.

  • ‘Astounding’ electronic art

    Art created electronically on tablets was unveiled Wednesday at a public reception for the artists and community members at the Springs House in Lancaster.
    The artists, pre-k students from Southside Early Childhood Center and adult clients from the Chester/Lancaster Disabilities and Special Needs center, created digital pieces using tablets and their own imaginations.

  • Mickles resigns teaching job

    Phillip Mickles has resigned from his teaching position at Barr Street Learning Center.
    The resignation became official after a vote during Tuesday night’s Lancaster County school board meeting.
    Mickles was placed on administrative leave in April after an allegation of improper discipline of a student. The Lancaster Police Department investigated the incident and did not charge Mickles with a crime, but he was not reinstated to his job at that time.

  • Smooth 1st day of school

    More than 12,000 students began the new academic year at the Lancaster County School District’s 22 schools on Thursday.
    It was smooth sailing most of the day, except for some traffic congestion around the district’s many on-going construction projects.
    “We had a little congestion at Lancaster High,” said David Knight, LCSD spokesman. “But nothing out of the ordinary for the first day of school.”

  • New elementary emerging from expanse of red clay

    Lancaster County school board members, district staff and community members gathered Monday afternoon to break ground on the Panhandle’s new elementary school.
    Expected to be complete next August, the 95,000-square-foot building will accommodate 1,170 students. The 36-acre site is on the west side of U.S. 521, just south of Rebound Road.
    School board member Melvin Stroble, who represents District 1, where the new school is being built, said the district needs additional facilities to support growth in the Panhandle.

  • LCSD honors teachers

    More than 1,000 Lancaster County School District teachers and faculty members in matching school T-shirts filled Buford High School’s gym Monday morning to celebrate great teaching.
    Four teachers from around the district were awarded annual teaching awards. Others were recognized for the number of years they had taught, including one teacher who has 54 years under his belt.
    Troy Helms, an agriculture teacher at Buford High, won the district-wide Great Teaching Award and the high school award. He has been an educator for 15 years.

  • ‘Leader in Me’ expands to 2 more schools

    Leader in Me, a program designed to teach elementary students management skills, is coming to North and Brooklyn Springs elementary schools this academic year.
    The three-year program, piloted in the county by Buford Elementary last year, is driven by Stephen Covey’s book “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.”
    Linda Blackwell, Lancaster County School District director of elementary instruction, said Leader in Me lets students become partners in their learning.

  • Delay at LHS stadium

    A construction delay at Lancaster High’s new artificial-turf football field has forced the school to move its first home game to Buford High’s new turf, which was a high priority to finish before hosting the annual jamboree this weekend.
    LHS athletics director Mark Strickland said he made the call to move the game because the field’s surrounding asphalt “drive-around” may not be ready on time.

  • College Advising Corps comes to 7 high schools

    From release

    The J. Marion Sims Foundation on Tuesday introduced to the community seven new College Advising Corps advisers, who begin their work this fall with students in Lancaster and Chester counties.
    The national college advising program, to be piloted in Chester and Lancaster high schools, serves students and schools in 15 other states through partnerships in 600 high schools. South Carolina’s program will be the 16th in the nation, and will add seven high schools to the national CAC network.