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Education

  • Antioch pumpkin patch full of fall fun, learning

    Indian Land Elementary School students filed off the bus Thursday into a field with hundreds of pumpkins at Antioch Baptist Church’s seventh-annual Great Pumpkin Patch.

    LeighAnn Edmondson and Tiffany Evans’ special-needs classes ran straight to the pumpkins sitting on pallets, tables and bleachers.

    Edmondson said her class has learned about the lifecycle and different sizes and colors of pumpkins.

  • Indian Land accounts for all growth in local schools

    The number of students attending Indian Land schools has increased more than 10 percent since this time last year, while the population of most of the county’s other schools has declined slightly.
    Of the county’s four high schools, only Indian Land High increased its student body from last school year.
    Indian Land’s school growth is driven mostly by the Panhandle’s two elementary schools.

  • Irma make-up day Oct. 9

    The Lancaster County School District has scheduled Oct. 9 as a make-up day for the day missed because of Hurricane Irma.
    School was canceled Sept. 11 as winds and rain from Irma passed through the Palmetto State.
    Oct. 9 was the next day students were not scheduled to be in school. It had been had been planned as a teacher workday.
    “We believe it’s important to use it as a make-up day,” said LCSD Superintendent Jonathan Phipps. “We still face the possibility of winter weather and more missed days.”

  • Library’s summer readers help ‘Build a Better World’

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    Nearly 2,000 readers in Lancaster County – signed up to “Build a Better World” at the annual summer reading program at the Lancaster, Del Webb and Kershaw libraries. 

    Held June 1-July 28, the building-themed event included patrons of all ages who attended special events and registered to read books and win prizes.

  • Top-to-bottom overhaul done, AJMS reopens for excited kids

    Nearly two months after fire blackened Andrew Jackson Middle School, students, teachers and faculty jammed the halls again Tuesday morning, delighted to be back home.
    “It’s been wonderful to be back,” said Kelly Phillips, assistant principal at AJMS. “There’s been a lot of excitement in the air. A lot of people have been commenting on how bright the school looks and how clean the walls are.”
    Steve Mann, a seventh-grade math teacher, said everyone was relieved and eager to get back to normal.

  • Chris Timmons named AJMS principal

    The Lancaster County school board Tuesday night named Chris Timmons the next principal of Andrew Jackson Middle School, which should reopen next week after extensive fire repairs.
    “I’m beside myself, to be honest,” said Timmons, who will replace the retiring Daryl Hinson at the end of the school year.
    Timmons is currently the assistant principal at Buford High School. He was the assistant principal at Buford Middle School for eight years, before being moved to the high school in September 2017.

  • Native American Studies Center gets $10,000 donation

    USC Lancaster

    USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center has received a $10,000 donation from OceanaGold/Haile Operation, which will sponsor four speakers for the monthly Lunch and Learn programs, held the third Friday of each month in the center’s galleries.  
    The four Lunch and Learn programs include:
    April 20: Dr. Katherine Osburn, Arizona State University, “The ‘Identified Full-Bloods’ in Mississippi: Race and Choctaw Identity, 1898-1918.”

  • Schools adopt text-alert system

    The Lancaster County School District has installed a new emergency alert system that can send information to parents, teachers and students instantly via text message.
    “It’s very similar to what’s used on university campuses. That’s the model we’re after,” said Bryan Vaughn, the district’s safety director. “This give folks immediate info, and it’s good because I can access it anywhere… whether I’m on the side of the road, in a classroom or in the middle of a situation.

  • Sidewalk plan in the works near ILMS

    Lancaster County is targeting a $112,000 grant to build sidewalks near Indian Land Middle School on River Road, a move to address student safety.
    A 300-signature petition pushing the S.C. Department of Transportation to install sidewalks was given to the school district in November. Signatures were collected by concerned Indian Land Middle parent Pam Houge.
    SCDOT got involved and the Lancaster County School District was on board with the petition.

  • New school switches to Eagles mascot

    The mascot of the new Van Wyck Elementary School will be the Eagles rather than the Braves, after the Catawba Indian Nation and other community members objected to the school board’s initial choice.
    The board voted unanimously Tuesday night to change the mascot after a meeting with Catawba Chief Bill Harris and the school’s naming committee.
    “[We] realized our effort to honor and pay tribute to the Catawbas would actually do the opposite,” said Superintendent Jonathan Phipps.